RAISE News

Exciting Opportunity to Shape Startup Support in Your Region!
Exciting Opportunity to Shape Startup Support in Your Region! 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

In its efforts to boost startup success, the RAISE project is working towards creating a fantastic new support system. As part of this mission, EURADA, along with its member FUNDECYT, is on a mission to gather insights from EU NUT 2 territories about services that help startups grow.

How Can You Contribute?

Help us by sharing your experiences! We want to hear about regional policies and programmes that support startups. Whether it’s funded by the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, or NextGenEU Funds, your input matters! Help us by completing the survey.

Why Your Voice Matters?

By participating in this survey, you play a crucial role in bridging the gaps in startup support across the EU. RAISE aims to create an integrated map of startup and scaleup support initiatives. Your insights will guide other regions on how to use structural funds effectively to empower startups.

How to Share Your Initiatives?

Help us by completing the survey. Respond to this survey and tell us about the impactful programmes in your region. Let’s build a network of support! 🤗

What’s Next?

The ultimate goal is to develop an interactive map of startup initiatives that is accessible to everyone. This map will serve as a guide for regional policymakers and programme managers. Check out the RAISE website for more details, and stay tuned for the positive changes we can create together!

For any questions about the survey, feel free to reach out to our colleague Nora Scantamburlo. Let’s work together for a thriving startup ecosystem!

Help us by completing the survey.

Mapping European Startup Support Initiatives
Mapping European Startup Support Initiatives 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

The RAISE Project stands as a collaborative effort among networks, national, and regional agencies at the EU level, working towards the establishment of a sustainable, integrated support framework to boost startup growth and scale-up activities across Europe. Recognizing the need to address the existing lack of integration among various support services and action plans, the project aims to bridge the gaps in startup support at the EU level.

Assessing Startup-Friendly Policies:

A key focus of the RAISE Project involves evaluating the evolution of startup-friendly regional policies and programs. These initiatives are often financed or co-financed by European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) or the Next Generation EU program. The project emphasizes the importance of a cohesive approach to ensure seamless support for startups throughout their lifecycle.

Collecting Regional Experiences:

The European Association of Development Agencies (EURADA) and FUNDECYT-Science and Technology Park of Extremadura, as RAISE Project partners, are actively engaged in collecting regional experiences and examples. The initiative spans EU NUT 2 territories and encompasses services supporting the entire startup lifecycle, capacity-building programs, and access initiatives to private investment or public funding, all of which leverage ESIF or Next Generation EU Funds.

Interactive Map Development:

The ultimate goal of this comprehensive data collection is the creation of an interactive map showcasing startups and scale-up support initiatives. This map will serve as a valuable resource, allowing policymakers and program managers to access insights into successful strategies employed by different regions. By sharing these experiences, the map aims to guide other regional stakeholders on effectively utilizing structural funds to support startups.

Call for Support:

In a bid to gather pertinent information, EURADA extends a call for support to stakeholders and participants involved in startup support programs across European regions. A survey has been circulated, seeking details about programs or projects funded by the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, or NextGenEU Funds that are currently active in various regions.

Participate in the Survey:

EURADA kindly requests the collaboration of regional actors and program managers by responding to the survey. Sharing information about active programs and projects will contribute to the development of a comprehensive database, enhancing the understanding of successful approaches to startup support across Europe. Link of the survey.

Empowering Europe’s Startup Ecosystem:

The RAISE Project is a testament to the commitment of European networks and agencies to foster a conducive environment for startup growth and scale-up. By mapping and sharing regional experiences, the project aims to empower policymakers and program managers with the knowledge to leverage structural funds effectively. Through collaboration and information exchange, the RAISE Project envisions a future where startups thrive across Europe, supported by well-informed and strategic regional initiatives.

EURADA coaching sessions and pilot actions for startups to enhance their business models and partnerships
EURADA coaching sessions and pilot actions for startups to enhance their business models and partnerships 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

With a successful rate of 1 out of 10, start-ups in Europe usually face several challenges in consolidating themselves and entering the market. For this reason, the RAISE project financed a series of coaching sessions tackling 5 main pivotal topics for their development.

A key component of the RAISE project is a series of coaching sessions and pilot actions aimed at providing valuable insights and practical solutions for startups to enhance their business models and partnerships. These coaching sessions were tailored to startup founders and representatives seeking to elevate their understanding of business partnership actions. 

This innovative framework focuses on implementing pilot actions, including training, mentoring, and networking sessions. These initiatives are designed to connect startup promoters with appropriate mentors and trainers, facilitating access to their target markets. 

The Region Alliance for Interconnected Startup Ecosystems – RAISE â€“ project aims to develop a new and sustainable integrated support framework to foster startup growth and scale-up across Europe. RAISE will address this by developing a long-term collaboration and action plan for the establishment of a virtual interconnected space. It targets companies that have already achieved first results, possibly supported by regional programmes and are now aiming to grow.

In this framework, one of the crucial actions foreseen by the projects was the creation of training, mentoring, and networking sessions, which could help startup promoters get in contact with the appropriate mentors and trainers who can help them gain access to their target markets. All project partners were required to contribute to the success of this task, by tackling topics such as Business Model Actions, Venture Capital actions, Talent Matching and Women Entrepreneurship. 

The action was designed to facilitate and enable startup promoters and their respective projects to proceed to the market, by focusing on sales channels expansions, technology partners and other business partnerships.

Business Partnership

Defined as the legal relationship that is most often formed by a written agreement between two or more individuals or companies, a Business Partnership is often not so easy to get, and to be achieved, several aspects must be considered. With the help of one of EURADA’s historical members, META Group, a leader in mentoring companies from ideas to market by coaching researchers, and entrepreneurs, investing in promising opportunities and advising public and private organisations on innovation strategies, we set up a two-month academy. Aiming at providing personalised training and interactive learning, this coaching session revolved around a total of four online workshops of 90 minutes each, dealing with crucial aspects. The structure of each workshop has been a sum of a theoretical session and a practical one, giving in this way the opportunity for participants to gather tailored tips related to their business directly from the coach.

From October to December of the previous year, a transformative series of coaching sessions unfolded, comprising four online workshops, each lasting 90 minutes. The structured format of each workshop included a theoretical session followed by a practical one. The schedule for these enlightening sessions unfolded as follows:

October 18 – Workshop 1: The Lean Canvas

Addressing a common pitfall that often befalls startups – failing to meet market needs – the first workshop on October 18 was dedicated to introducing the Lean Canvas as a strategic planning tool. This session aimed to equip early-stage startups with the necessary tools to avoid the pitfalls associated with developing products or services without a genuine market demand. The Lean Canvas workshop at first taught us that one of the grounds for failures for early-stage startups is that usually there is no market need towards the products/services they are developing. Thus, to avoid falling into this statistic, it is important for early-stage startups to explore the Lean Canvas as a strategic planning tool. The first goal in adopting the Lean Canvas is to reach the problem-solution fit, which happens when a startup is developing a solution for a specific need for the customers.


November 6 – Workshop 2: The Unique Value Propositions Canvas

Continuing the journey on November 6, Workshop 2 was centred around achieving the problem-solution fit using the Lean Canvas. The emphasis was placed on the Unique Value Proposition (UVP) as a strategic tool crucial to the success of startups. Attendees delved into the intricacies of crafting solutions tailored to specific customer needs. The Unique Value Propositions (UVP) Canva workshop thus emphasised that to reach this goal, startups need to use the UVP as a strategic tool when undertaking the marker analysis. Needless to say, high-growth, early-stage startups need money to scale and boost their activities. It is then important that founders and CEOs understand the different kinds of investors operating in their market are, and which is the best way to approach them.


November 21 – Workshop 3: Approaching Risk Capital Investors

Navigating the complex landscape of funding, Workshop 3 on November 21 provided invaluable guidance to high-growth startups. Founders were led through an exploration of the various types of investors in the market and were equipped with the best approaches to secure funding. This workshop served as a crucial step for startups aiming to scale their activities. The Approaching Risk Capital Investors workshop highlighted some tips and techniques to put into practice in order to succeed in this. The first approach to investors is the key to increasing the odds of getting the funds.


December 5 – Workshop 4: How to Master Your Pitch

The series concluded on December 5 with Workshop 4, which honed in on the art of pitching. Recognizing the pivotal role of the initial pitch in securing investor interest and funding, this session provided essential insights into crafting impactful presentations. Startups were guided on how to articulate their vision and value proposition effectively, increasing their odds of securing vital financial support. Thus, as stressed during the last workshop How to master your pitch, preparing a great pitch about their mission and value added is crucial for start-ups to move the first steps.


These coaching sessions, curated to enhance the understanding of business partnerships and foster the growth of startups, brought together a diverse group of entrepreneurs eager to refine their skills and strategies. The structured approach of theoretical and practical sessions aimed to empower startups on their journey toward success and sustainability. It becomes clear that, in order to build a European start-up ecosystem, it is crucial for entrepreneurs to be experienced practitioners, having first-hand knowledge of the creation, management and advising of business ventures. EURADA is glad to have contributed to this mission and to share the success of its academy, which caught the attention of 31 people registered from all over Europe.


ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Lorenzo Valeriani

Leading these coaching sessions is Lorenzo Valeriani, a Senior Project Manager and startups coach at META Group. With over 25 years of experience, META Group has played a crucial role in driving knowledge from idea to market. Lorenzo Valeriani brings a wealth of expertise, having been involved in coaching researchers, entrepreneurs, and investing in promising opportunities.

META Group: A Catalyst for Innovation

META Group, built by entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs, operates across three key areas:

META Investment:

  • Investing in high-growth startups across Europe.

META Academy:

  • Nurturing and guiding young people, entrepreneurs, and scientists in transforming ideas into high-growth startups.

META Advisory:

  • Providing policy advice on stimulating innovation and startups to a diverse range of clients, including individual cities and the European Commission.

With a unique edge in all stages of the entrepreneurial life cycle, META Group stands as a driving force in fostering innovation, supporting startups, and shaping policies at local, national, and international levels. This integrated support framework is poised to significantly impact the startup landscape in Europe, providing the necessary tools for success and growth.

The Role of RAISE Regional Steering Group in Shaping Startup Success
The Role of RAISE Regional Steering Group in Shaping Startup Success 1024 586 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

The RAISE project partners are dedicated to crafting a comprehensive action plan aimed at transforming innovative startup ideas into robust frameworks at both the EU and global levels. The RAISE Regional Steering Group, comprising seasoned professionals from diverse backgrounds, plays a significant role in steering and validating this ambitious action plan. To ensure the success of this critical phase, the Steering Group has been assembled to provide expertise and validation for the proposed methodology and action plan.

Who is included in the Steering Group?

The Steering Group consists of 13 high-level professionals, Comprising 13 high-level professionals and policy experts from various sectors, this group brings together a wealth of experience from Regional Development Agencies (RDAs), Regional Governments, Innovation Centers, Digital Innovation Hubs (DIH), and more. Representing 10 countries, including Belgium, Croatia, Germany, Italy, Malta, Lithuania, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, the group is a melting pot of expertise and perspectives and a diverse assembly of thought leaders committed to advancing startup initiatives.

The Steering Group operates through two dedicated working groups:

  1. Group 1: First Revision
  2. Group 2: Comments Implementation and Finalisation These working groups serve as specialised teams, ensuring a thorough and comprehensive review process to enhance the quality and effectiveness of the action plan.

Tasks of the Steering Group

The RAISE partners rely on the support of the Steering Group to provide technical reviews of deliverables related to the design and testing of pilot actions (D2.1). This collaborative effort aims to refine the proposed methodologies and action plans, ensuring they meet the highest standards of innovation and feasibility.

As the RAISE project advances, the Regional Steering Group stands as a cornerstone, steering and validating the envisioned action plan. Through their collective expertise, the Steering Group contributes significantly to the success of the RAISE project, fostering the growth and scale-up of innovative startup ideas on both European and international fronts.

Learn More

Market Research and Data-Driven Decisions
Market Research and Data-Driven Decisions 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

In a series of sessions, “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success” event, organized by the RAISE team and led by the International Consortium of Research Staff Associations (ICoRSA), highlighted the significant role that researchers play in driving innovation, fostering real-world impact, and nurturing talent within the dynamic startup ecosystem. At the forefront of this series was Session 3, titled “Market Research and Data-Driven Decisions,” held on November 15, 2023, and featuring Alexandra Potter-Hnativ from Silent Accelerator, Belgium.

The session delved into critical aspects that form the bedrock of successful market research and data-driven decision-making for startups. Among the key discussions were:

1. How to Conduct Market Research and Develop an Innovation Funnel?

Market research is not just about gathering data but understanding how to leverage it strategically. The innovation funnel is a systematic approach to idea generation, validation, and implementation, ensuring a streamlined process for startups to bring their ideas to market.

2. Validating Ideas with the Market and Accelerating Product/Market Fit for Tech-Driven Startups

The session emphasized the importance of validating ideas with the market as a crucial step in the journey of technology-driven startups. Potter-Hnativ highlighted methods to accelerate the process of finding product/market fit, an essential element for startup success. By aligning ideas with market needs, startups can refine their offerings and enhance their chances of success in a competitive landscape.

3. Data-Driven Insights: Unlocking the Power of Consumer Behavior Analysis

A central theme of the session revolved around data-driven insights and their role in providing startups with a competitive edge. Potter-Hnativ unraveled the methodologies researchers employ to conduct market research and analyze consumer behavior. By harnessing data, startups can make informed decisions, understand market trends, and tailor their strategies to meet consumer demands effectively.

4. Shaping Startup Strategies: Impactful Instances of Research-Driven Market Insights

The session concluded with compelling instances showcasing how research-driven market insights have significantly influenced startup strategies. Whether adapting to changing consumer preferences or pivoting in response to market dynamics, startups armed with research-backed insights are better equipped to navigate challenges and chart a course toward sustainable growth.

The “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success” event underscored the transformative impact that market research and data-driven decision-making can have on the trajectory of startups. As the entrepreneurial landscape continues to evolve, the integration of research-driven insights remains a cornerstone for success, guiding startups towards innovation, market relevance, and enduring impact.


Principles for Successful Market Research in Startups


In this insightful presentation, we’ve delved into ten essential principles that form a strategic framework for conducting effective market research in the startup ecosystem. These principles encompass crucial aspects such as customer insights, data collection, product-market fit, metric tracking, organizational teamwork, and the nuanced interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data. By understanding and applying these principles, startups can enhance their ability to navigate market dynamics, meet customer needs, and make informed strategic decisions, ultimately increasing their chances of success in the competitive business landscape.


The First Principle: the Essence of Market Research: Decoding its Scope and Significance


In the intricate landscape of product development, market research emerges as a beacon guiding businesses through the tumultuous journey of ideation to fruition. Let’s embark on a journey to demystify market research, understanding its depth, scope, and the significant role it plays in the symbiotic relationship between marketing and product development.

Going Beyond the Surface: Market Research Demystified

Market research, often considered the compass for entrepreneurial ventures, transcends mere data collection. It embodies a comprehensive exploration, aiming to uncover nuanced consumer behaviors, market trends, and potential pitfalls. Going beyond the surface, market research is the bridge that connects innovative ideas with real-world demands.

Exploring the Natural Connection between Marketing and Product Development

In the natural progression of product development, marketing and market research intertwine seamlessly. Marketing relies on the insights gleaned from market research to craft compelling strategies, while product development aligns itself with these strategies to meet market needs effectively. This symbiotic relationship underscores the innate connection between marketing, product, and the invaluable insights derived from meticulous market research.

The Essence of Market Research: Acquiring Data and Understanding the Market Dynamics

 Central to market research is the acquisition of data, but it transcends the mere collection of statistics. It entails understanding the intricate dynamics of the market, decoding consumer preferences, and forecasting trends. What data is essential in this pursuit, and how can it be harnessed to not only meet the demands of the present but also anticipate the needs of the future? These are the questions that market research seeks to answer, making it an indispensable compass for product developers navigating the ever-evolving business landscape.

As we delve deeper into the product development journey, we unravel the layers of the first principle – the Product Success Triangle, which revolves around understanding the customer, leveraging data talent, and crafting business strategies that propel product development into realms of success. 

Navigating the Product Success Triangle: A Holistic Approach

In the realm of product development, the journey to success is charted through a multifaceted approach encapsulated by the Product Success Triangle. This framework, an amalgamation of customer-centricity, data prowess, and strategic business acumen, propels startups and businesses towards achieving sustainable growth. Let’s delve into the intricacies of each dimension and understand how they harmonize to steer the product development voyage.

The Customer-Centric Core: The Path to Insightful Development 

At the heart of the Product Success Triangle lies the customer – the North Star guiding every decision and innovation. It entails understanding the intricacies of the market, deciphering consumer behaviors, and distilling these insights into actionable strategies. By peeling back the layers of customer preferences, pain points, and aspirations, businesses gain a profound understanding that forms the bedrock of successful product development.

Data Prowess: Translating Numbers into Strategic Advantages 

Data, often hailed as the new currency, assumes a significant role in the Product Success Triangle. However, it’s not merely about amassing data but transforming it into strategic advantages. For startups, the advantage lies in agility – the ability to swiftly collect, interpret, and act upon data. Unlike large corporations, startups have the flexibility to adapt swiftly, turning data-driven insights into tangible product enhancements. It’s not about the quantity of data but the acumen to extract meaningful patterns that fuel innovation.

Strategic Business Acumen: Bridging Data and Development with Informed Strategies 

While data highlights the path, strategic business acumen serves as the guide, directing product development towards market success. The insights gleaned from market research and data analytics are channeled into formulating business strategies that align with market demands. This strategic layer ensures that every product iteration, enhancement, or launch is a calculated move, minimizing risks and maximizing market penetration.

As we traverse the landscape of the Product Success Triangle, it becomes apparent that success is not an isolated achievement but an orchestrated symphony of customer understanding, data utilization, and strategic finesse.

Embracing Data-Driven Success: The Crucial Role of Market Research

Embarking on the trajectory of market research, startups unravel the bedrock of insights that can propel their journey toward success. In the evolving landscape of innovation and technology-driven startups, leveraging market research is not just a prerogative but a strategic imperative. Let’s dissect the key components of this essential process and show how it contributes to the dynamic interplay within the Product Success Triangle.

Market Research: Decoding the Layers of Consumer Behavior 

Market research serves as the compass that guides startups through the intricate labyrinth of consumer behavior. Understanding the needs, desires, and pain points of the target audience is not a luxury but a necessity. This phase involves meticulous data collection, surveys, and analysis to unravel the layers of consumer behavior, providing a foundation for informed decision-making.

Validation Through Market Interaction: From Ideas to Viable Products 

An important aspect of market research is the validation of ideas through direct interaction with the target market. Startups need to gauge the resonance of their concepts, ensuring alignment with market needs. This iterative process involves constant refinement based on real-time feedback, fostering the evolution of ideas into viable products that seamlessly integrate with consumer expectations.

Accelerating Product-Market Fit: The Nexus of Innovation and Demand 

Market research acts as the accelerator, propelling startups towards achieving the coveted product-market fit. By aligning product development with validated market needs, startups can bridge the gap between innovation and demand. This alignment ensures that every feature, enhancement, or innovation resonates with the pulse of the market, fostering a symbiotic relationship between product evolution and consumer requirements.

Data-Powered Guidance: Navigating the Complexities with Precision 

In the data-driven era, startups are bestowed with a trove of information. Market research, when coupled with robust data analytics, provides startups with data-powered guidance. It’s not just about knowing the market; it’s about deciphering the nuances within the data to glean actionable insights. This guidance becomes the north star, steering startups away from potential pitfalls and towards strategic decisions rooted in market realities.

Shaping Strategies: A Market-Infused Approach to Startup Growth 

Armed with insights from market research, startups can craft strategies that resonate with their audience. From product positioning to marketing campaigns, every facet of a startup’s strategy can be infused with market intelligence. This ensures that resources are channeled efficiently, maximizing impact and fostering growth in alignment with market dynamics.


Principle Two: Embracing the Unknown in Market Exploration


The second principle ushers us into the realm of embracing the unknown—a significant facet in the journey of market exploration. As founders embark on the quest to shape their companies, understanding what they don’t know becomes a compass guiding them through uncharted territories. Let’s unravel the layers of this principle, which serves as a beacon for those navigating the intricate landscape of entrepreneurship.

The Quest for Knowledge: A Founder’s Role in Market Discovery 

In the entrepreneurial landscape, being a founder involves more than possessing all the answers—it’s about knowing what questions to ask. The principle emphasizes the importance of founders, or those in the early stages of envisioning their companies, recognizing the value of exploring the unknown. This is particularly vital when it comes to decisions about product development, market positioning, and overall company strategy.

Dispelling the Myth of Solitary Decision-Making 

One question surfaces prominently in the entrepreneurial journey: “How do you decide what to build?” The fallacy lies in assuming that a founder, often the author of the technology, should single-handedly bear the responsibility for all decisions within the company. The second principle challenges this notion, asserting that decisions are not unilateral but should involve a dynamic interplay between the product leader, the market, and consumers.

The Market as a Collaborative Decision-Maker 

Contrary to a centralized decision-making approach, the principle underscores that the market and consumers play an instrumental role in shaping decisions. While a founder may have a strong vision, true success is found in aligning that vision with the needs and expectations of the market. The guiding principle encourages a collaborative approach, where decisions are influenced by the dynamic dialogue between a company and its audience.

Empowering Validation: Engaging with Potential Customers 

For founders seeking validation and insights, a practical approach involves engaging with potential customers. This market research, devoid of substantial budgets, hinges on direct conversations. A key recommendation is to reach out to a diverse group of individuals, avoiding the echo chamber of friends and family. The principle suggests interacting with 30 to 50 independent individuals to glean authentic perspectives untainted by internal biases.

Market Research on a Shoestring: A Call to Action 

As a guiding principle, embracing the unknown encourages founders to embark on cost-effective market research journeys. Dispelling the myth that decisions rest solely on the shoulders of a founder, the principle champions collaboration with the market and consumers. It underscores that, even in the absence of exhaustive budgets, meaningful insights can be derived through genuine conversations, ultimately steering the company toward informed and collective decision-making.


Principle Three: Unmasking Truths in Customer Interactions


As the journey unfolds and founders engage with potential customers, Principle Three shows a critical reality—customer statements aren’t always an unfiltered representation of truth. The principle crystallizes around a fundamental ethos: “We don’t care what people say.” In the intricate realm of market research, the principle emphasizes the need to discern beyond verbal affirmations and delve into genuine customer behavior. Let’s explore the essence of this principle and the strategic approach it advocates.

The Deceptive Nature of Verbal Affirmations 

Market research often encounters a common pitfall: the disjunction between what customers articulate and their subsequent actions. Traditional questions like, “Do you like my product?” or “How much would you pay for it?” often yield responses that diverge from actual behaviors when faced with the product in real scenarios. Acknowledging this dissonance becomes important in navigating the complex landscape of customer interactions.

Trusting Actions Over Words: A Foundational Shift 

The guiding principle asserts that while customers may accurately articulate their problems and pain points, their understanding of how these problems should be solved can be inherently flawed. Here lies the crux—founders, particularly those with an engineering or inventive background, must recognize the limitations of explicit questioning. Rather than relying solely on what customers say, the principle advocates a profound shift toward observing customer reactions in natural settings.

Understanding the Truth in Problems 

Customers, undeniably, are accurate in expressing their problems and needs. The principle underscores the reliability of customer insights when it comes to identifying pain points, unmet needs, or gaps in the market. This becomes a cornerstone for founders aiming to tailor their solutions to genuine customer demands.

Observational Wisdom: A Subtle Approach to Uncover Truth 

The principle offers practical guidance for founders—observe, don’t interrogate. Rather than posing leading questions that elicit socially acceptable responses, opt for a more subtle approach. Understanding how customers naturally interact with a product or service provides nuanced insights that explicit queries may fail to capture.

Propelling Realism through Commitment 

Moving forward in the market research journey, the principle advocates propelling realism by moving beyond superficial discussions. Founders are encouraged to prompt customers to subscribe, commit to payments, or express a symbolic intent to engage with the product. This swift progression toward tangible commitments aids founders in gauging the actual market readiness of their product or solution.

Accelerating Insights: A Practical Imperative 

In essence, Principle Three functions as a practical imperative, urging founders to expedite their understanding of market viability. By navigating past surface-level affirmations, embracing observational wisdom, and fostering customer commitments, founders can unravel the truths concealed within customer interactions, enabling a more realistic assessment of their product’s readiness for the market.


Principle Four: Accelerating Market Understanding: Action-Oriented Approach for Genuine Insights


In Principle 4, the emphasis shifts towards an action-oriented approach, urging founders to seek the truth by prompting real commitments from potential customers. The crux of this principle lies in proposing concrete actions, such as subscription, payments, or symbolic gestures like letters of intent. This approach aims to swiftly gauge the market’s response and determine the actual viability and acceptance of the product or solution. Let’s explore the key components of Principle 4 and how it translates into actionable insights.

Provoking Real Intent: A Direct Path to Market Validation

The essence of this principle lies in the direct engagement of potential customers. Instead of relying solely on verbal feedback, founders are encouraged to propose tangible commitments. This could involve inviting users to subscribe to a service, commit to a payment, or even request symbolic gestures like letters of intent. The immediacy of these actions serves as a litmus test for the true interest and acceptance of the product in the market.

Swift Understanding of Market Readiness

The faster founders can prompt these commitments, the more realistic insights they gain about the product’s readiness for the market. By seeking real financial or symbolic investments from potential customers, founders can bypass hypothetical discussions and gauge actual market demand. This accelerates the understanding of whether the product resonates with the audience and has the potential for success.

Translating Commitments into Actionable Data

Principle 4 advocates for a qualitative approach to data collection. The more interviews conducted and variables introduced—such as different pricing models, feedback mechanisms, or performance metrics—the richer the dataset becomes. This self-collected data serves as a valuable resource for founders, providing nuanced insights into customer behavior, preferences, and the overall market landscape.

Empowering Founders: From Buying Data to DIY Research

The core message underlying Principle 4 is a paradigm shift from buying external data to empowering founders to conduct their own research. Rather than relying solely on pre-existing market reports, founders are encouraged to actively engage with their audience, elicit commitments, and gather firsthand data. This DIY approach not only fosters a deeper understanding of the market but also positions founders as active participants in shaping their product’s trajectory.


Principle Five: Implementing Four Killer Questions

Principle 5 delves into the practical implementation of data, focusing on four crucial questions that fine-tune the understanding of a product’s impact, usability, feasibility, and overall viability as a business. As founders navigate their data trove, these questions serve as guiding beacons for informed decision-making. Let’s dissect the four killer questions and how they contribute to shaping a successful venture.

1. Value? Elevating Life and Work

The first killer question revolves around the value proposition. Do users feel an enhancement in their lives or a boost in productivity? This centers on gauging the tangible impact of the solution and ensuring that it genuinely elevates the user experience, making their lives or work noticeably better.

2. Usability? The Litmus Test for Sustainable Engagement

Usability becomes an important metric in the second question. It’s not just about having a groundbreaking solution; it’s about making it user-friendly. If a product, despite its brilliance, poses challenges in terms of design or ease of use, user engagement falters. Sustainable engagement depends on how seamlessly users can integrate the solution into their routines.

3. Feasibility? Balancing Ambition with Practicality

Feasibility, the third question, ventures into the realm of technology and engineering. Even if users desire to revisit the product, the feasibility question interrogates the practicality of building and sustaining it. This involves striking a delicate balance between the solution’s cost, production sustainability, and the technical complexities involved.

4. Viability? The Ultimate Business Litmus Test

The fourth and final question crystallises the vision into a business perspective. While a solution may be valuable, usable, and feasible, its viability as a business hinges on economic considerations. If the cost of development and deployment surpasses a threshold, the once-promising venture might falter. This question compels founders to critically evaluate whether the brilliance of the solution aligns with sustainable and profitable business practices.

A Holistic Approach to Decision-Making

Principle 5 advocates for a holistic approach to decision-making, drawing on data from user interviews, social media traction, sales figures, and product usage analytics. By systematically applying the four killer questions to these data sets, founders can distill valuable insights that guide their next steps. This approach ensures that the venture not only addresses user needs but also aligns with practical and economic considerations, fostering a well-rounded path to success.


Principle Six: The Culmination: Achieving Product-Market Fit

Principle 6 marks the pinnacle on the business site—a crucial juncture where your product seamlessly aligns with the market. Achieving Product-Market Fit is the culmination of extensive research, data-driven decisions, and a relentless pursuit of meeting customer needs. Let’s unravel the essence of this principle and understand why it’s the sought-after “yes” moment for startups.

The Quest for Alignment

Product-Market Fit is the harmonious alignment of your product with the demands of the market. It’s not just about having a great idea; it’s about that magical point where your solution resonates with your target audience. This alignment signifies that your product isn’t merely a creation but a solution eagerly sought by customers.

The Litmus Test: Overwhelmed by Demand

The litmus test for Product-Market Fit is the surge in demand. When you find the right fit, your customer base extends beyond early adopters, and there’s a palpable enthusiasm to purchase your product. This surge can be overwhelming, indicating that you’ve struck the right chord with your audience.

Knowing You’re on the Right Track

As a founder, this moment serves as validation—a resounding affirmation that your business is on the right track. The resonance between your product and the market signifies that you’ve decoded the intricate puzzle of customer preferences and delivered a solution that addresses their pain points effectively.


Principle Seven: Navigating Post Product-Market Fit: Metrics that Matter

Principle 7 delves into the crucial realm of metrics, steering you through the post-Product-Market Fit landscape. As you bask in the success of aligning your product with market demands, understanding and measuring key metrics become paramount. Here’s your guide to the metrics that matter and how they pave the way for informed decisions:

A Wealth of Measurable Insights

After achieving Product-Market Fit, the journey continues with metrics that unravel the intricacies of your business. These metrics offer a wealth of measurable insights, empowering you to make data-driven decisions that resonate with the specifics of your product and market.

Financial Metrics: Business Health

Among the array of metrics, financial indicators take center stage. Whether you’re in the software domain or navigating the marketing landscape, financial metrics provide a window into your business health. Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR), Lifetime Value (LTV), Acquisition Cost, and Churn Rate become guiding lights in assessing the fiscal pulse of your enterprise.

Tailoring Metrics to Your Technology

The beauty lies in tailoring these metrics to your technology and business model. If you’re dealing with software, understanding MRR might be important, while marketers may find LTV and acquisition costs more pertinent. The key is picking metrics that align with your product’s unique journey and the demands of your market.

Beyond the Numbers: Looking at the Right Metric

The essence lies not just in the numbers but in whether you’re looking at the right metrics for your startup. Principle 7 emphasizes that your judgment will be scrutinized based on your choice of metrics—those that align with your product, market, and business objectives.

Navigating the Post-Fit Terrain with Confidence

As you embark on the post-Product-Market Fit journey armed with insightful metrics, you navigate the entrepreneurial terrain with confidence. The metrics become your allies, offering a compass to steer through the challenges and capitalise on the opportunities that emerge after achieving that coveted alignment with the market.


Principle Eight: Team Empowerment and Data-Driven Culture

The journey to data-driven decisions is a collaborative one, emphasizing the need for a cohesive team effort. Organizing your team effectively is crucial to harnessing the power of data. Here’s a guide on how to structure your team at various stages, fostering a culture where data is a shared responsibility:

Stage One: Founder as the Driving Force

In the initial stage, the founder assumes a dual role as both the product lead and marketer. With the responsibility of wearing multiple hats, the founder becomes the central hub where all data converges. This setup emphasizes the founder’s significant role in shaping the data-driven direction of the startup.

Stage Two: Empowered Engineers Taking the Lead

As the startup evolves, a key shift occurs with the emergence of empowered engineers. In technology and innovation-driven companies, engineers with marketing and finance acumen become integral. The message is clear – engineers should not shy away from delving into metrics. Training engineers to understand marketing nuances and financial metrics equips them to contribute meaningfully to data-driven decisions.

Advantages of Engineer Involvement in Metrics

Empowering engineers with marketing skills is an investment that pays off. If a dedicated marketing team is not yet feasible, engineers with basic marketing knowledge can fill the gap. They seamlessly integrate marketing insights into their workflow, ensuring a holistic understanding of metrics, from engineering numbers to marketing dynamics.

Beyond Engineering Numbers: Holistic Market Understanding

Engineers are encouraged to go beyond their traditional scope and grasp marketing intricacies. Understanding how much it costs to sell a product, tracking customer acquisition, and connecting these metrics with their workflow enriches their contribution. This approach proves cost-effective and strategically smart in the long run.

Stage Three: Scaling Up with Dedicated Product Teams

In the advanced stage of scaling up, the team structure replicates the foundational principles established in stage two. Dedicated product teams now inherit the culture of understanding and leveraging metrics. The structure ensures a seamless transition and continuity of the data-driven ethos as the startup grows.

Training and Growth: A Strategic Investment

The emphasis is on training and growing the engineering team with diverse skills. This strategic investment ensures that the team, regardless of its size, possesses a holistic understanding of data, marketing, and finance. It’s not about engineers becoming marketing experts but about integrating fundamental marketing skills into their toolkit.

The Smart Approach: Data-Driven Engineers as Assets

The overarching message is clear – don’t wait until financial capabilities allow hiring a dedicated marketing team. Instead, foster a culture where engineers become assets in the realm of data-driven decisions. This approach is not only cost-effective but also aligns the team with a mindset that values understanding the right metrics for the startup’s journey.


Principle Nine: Crafting Value – Moving Beyond Features

In the ninth principle, the focus shifts towards perceiving your product not merely as a collection of features but as a comprehensive solution that delivers genuine value. This principle underscores the importance of considering your idea holistically, ensuring it transcends individual features to create a compelling and differentiated product.

Avoid Feature-Centric Research

When conducting research, especially interviews or questionnaires, the trap of being overly feature-centric must be avoided. Teams, particularly those with a strong engineering focus, tend to emphasize specific features and their likability. However, the true measure of success lies in evaluating whether the product, as a whole, effectively accomplishes its intended purpose.

Thinking Holistically: The Product as a Whole

Rather than fixating on individual features, envision your idea as an integrated product. A successful product is not defined by a single fancy feature but by its ability to holistically address user needs. Users seldom switch to a product solely for one standout feature; the product must provide a comprehensive solution that outshines competitors.

Differentiation and Worthiness of Switching

Consider the overall user experience and the value proposition your product offers. To entice users to switch or adopt your product, it must go beyond a single feature. Successful products provide a unique combination of features, making the switch not only beneficial but also compelling for users.


Principle Ten: Growth – The Magic of Interpretation


The tenth and final principle delves into the art of making market research truly impactful. It emphasizes the vital role of interpreting data across two key dimensions: quantitative and qualitative. Understanding the unique insights offered by each dimension is crucial for extracting meaningful conclusions and steering your product in the right direction.

Quantitative Data: Performance Metrics

Quantitative data, often synonymous with performance metrics, swiftly answers fundamental questions about your product. Is it functional? Is it user-friendly? For instance, if your app crashes during an event, quantitative data shows this issue, offering concrete evidence of technical hitches.

Qualitative Data: The Depth of Understanding

On the other hand, qualitative data goes beyond the surface, exploring the ‘why’ behind user actions. It involves deep interviews, focus groups, and keen observations to unearth the intricate motivations and sentiments driving user decisions. This aligns with the wisdom shared in Principle 3, acknowledging that people might not always articulate their true feelings.

Balancing Act: Leveraging Both Data Dimensions

The true magic lies in finding a harmonious balance between quantitative and qualitative insights. While quantitative data paints a quick overview of performance, qualitative data demonstrates the nuanced reasons and emotions influencing user decisions. By skillfully integrating both dimensions, you gain a comprehensive understanding of your product’s strengths and areas for improvement.

Principle 10 Summarized: Growth through Research Implementation

In essence, Principle 10 encapsulates the entire journey of market research, emphasizing that both quantitative and qualitative data must be harnessed to answer critical questions about your product. As a founder, understanding the ‘how’ and ‘why’ behind user interactions can empower you to make informed decisions, thereby unlocking the growth potential of your product.


Q&A Session

1. Understanding the Basics:

Q1: What is the foundational principle of market research mentioned in the presentation? A: The foundational principle is to understand the problem you’re solving and for whom. Instead of asking users what they want, observe their behaviors and understand their pain points.

Q2: How does the presenter emphasize the importance of collecting data? A: Alexandra emphasised that collecting one’s own data through interviews and diverse variables is crucial. This approach enables startups to gather personalised insights and make informed decisions.

2. Key Principles for Effective Market Research:

Q3: What is the significance of the fourth principle? A: This principle urges startups to encourage user commitment, whether through subscriptions, payments, or symbolic actions. The faster a startup can obtain this commitment, the better it can gauge product readiness and user satisfaction.

Q4: Why does the presenter stress the need for varied metrics in the fifth principle? A: Implementing diverse metrics, such as value, usability, feasibility, and viability, helps in thoroughly assessing the product’s potential success and the overall fit in the market.

3. Finding Product-Market Fit:

Q5: What does the presenter suggest indicates achieving product-market fit? A: Product-market fit is indicated when there’s a significant demand for the product, with a line of customers ready to make purchases, leading to a sense of overwhelming demand.

4. Metrics and Financial Considerations:

Q6: Why does the presenter highlight the importance of financial metrics? A: Financial metrics are crucial indicators for business viability. Monthly recurring revenue, lifetime value, acquisition cost, and churn rate help startups understand the financial health and sustainability of their venture.

5. Organizing Teams for Data-Driven Decisions:

Q7: How does the presenter recommend organizing a team for effective market research? A: The presenter suggests a phased approach, starting with founders handling both product and marketing roles, followed by empowered engineers who understand marketing, and eventually, dedicated product teams replicating the established structure.

6. The Value of a Holistic Product:

Q8: What does the seventh principle emphasize regarding the product? A: The principle stresses the importance of viewing the idea not just as a set of features but as a holistic product. Startups should focus on overall product usability and value rather than individual features.

7. Post Product-Market Fit Metrics:

Q9: What are the key metrics recommended after achieving product-market fit? A: Post product-market fit, startups should focus on financial metrics such as monthly recurring revenue, lifetime value, and acquisition cost to make data-driven decisions and guide further growth.

8. Team Organisation for Data Empowerment:

Q10: How does Alexandra suggest organising teams to empower data-driven decisions? A: The presenter recommends building teams that understand both technology and marketing, starting with founders wearing multiple hats, followed by engineers incorporating marketing knowledge, and eventually scaling up with dedicated product teams.

Q11: Why does Alexandra caution against focusing too much on individual features in market research? A: The presenter warns against overemphasising specific features and encourages startups to view their ideas as complete products. Users seldom switch to a new product for a single feature; it must offer a comprehensive and differentiated value.

9. The Magic of Market Research:

Q12: How does the presenter highlight the dual dimensions of market research data? A: The presenter distinguishes between quantitative and qualitative data, with quantitative data answering yes/no questions about product performance, while qualitative data, obtained through interviews, reveals the reasons behind user preferences and behaviours.


About the Speaker

Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, MBA is a talented Venture Builder & Go-To-Market Advisory.

Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, MBA

Alexandra’s professional journey began in a marketing communication agency, where she developed her skills and discovered a passion for understanding market dynamics and consumer behaviour. This early experience set the stage for her subsequent career at the intersection of marketing and technology.

A significant chapter in Alexandra’s career unfolded during her time at Solvay, a Belgian Chemical Company. Assigned to explore the role of specialty polymers in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry, she delved into market research, sparking her interest in leveraging data for informed decision-making.

The journey continued as Alexandra moved to AB InBev, a major player in the global beer industry. Managing a substantial budget for market research, she gained a unique perspective on the challenges and opportunities of procuring and utilising market data in a large consumer-centric company. Her career trajectory showcases a practical and results-driven approach to navigating the complexities of marketing and technology.

Using Technology and Data for Talent Matching
Using Technology and Data for Talent Matching 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

In an event called “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success,” experts gathered to talk about how technology is changing the game for startups. Organised by the RAISE team and led by the International Consortium of Research Staff Associations (ICoRSA), this event explored how tech is driving innovation, helping in the real world, and supporting talent in the startup world. One standout session, held on November 16, 2023, was all about “Using Technology and Data for Talent Matching,” featuring insights from Peter Oraya of Oxford Aptitude Limited.

Main Parts of the 4th Session

  1. Reshaping How We Find Jobs: Data Science and Tech Make Job Hunting Easier:This part showed us how using data and technology is making it much easier for people to find jobs, especially in a very competitive job market.
  2. Big Changes in Farming and Manufacturing: Using Data to Get Specialized Skills: The session explained how using data is making a big difference in farming and making things. It’s helping people get really good at specific skills, making farming and manufacturing more efficient and creative.
  3. Schools Are Changing: Tech is Helping Match Students with the Right Jobs: The event discussed how technology is changing schools. It’s helping match students with the right jobs by using data science. This means students can find jobs that fit their skills better.
  4. Sports and Entertainment: Finding Talent in a New Way with Data and Tech: The session looked at how data and technology are changing the way we find talented people in sports and entertainment. This is making it easier to identify and recruit people with special skills in these exciting fields.
  5. Always Learning: How Tech Keeps Us Growing in Our Jobs with Kimodata: The last part highlighted how technology, especially tools like Kimodata, is helping us keep learning in our jobs. This means we can always grow and adapt to new things, making us better professionals.

Introduction to Online Market Research and Talent Matching in Education and Work

In the initial segment of the discussion, provided a comprehensive introduction to the pivotal topics of online market research and talent matching within the realms of education and work.

Overview of the Pandemic Landscape 

The pandemic had necessitated a reevaluation of conventional models, especially in education and work. The disruption caused by lockdowns and social distancing measures prompted a spike in the adoption of remote work and online learning. As one speaker articulated, “the pandemic has forced us to rethink how we approach education and employment.”

Unique Challenges and Opportunities 

While the pandemic posed challenges, such as the abrupt shift to virtual modes, it also presented unique opportunities. The discussion framed online market research and talent matching as responses to the evolving needs of individuals and organisations in this altered landscape. The term “talent matching” encapsulated the idea of aligning skills with opportunities in the digital domain.

The Role of Remote Work in the Pandemic Era 

A significant emphasis was placed on the role of remote work during the pandemic. It was underlined that remote work was not just a necessity during the health crisis but had evolved into a viable strategy for maintaining productivity and safety simultaneously. The idea resonated strongly in phrases like “working online is a good way to keep working and keep safe at the same time.”

Exploring Feasibility and Effectiveness 

There was an exploration into the feasibility and effectiveness of remote work and online education. It was presented as an experiment to discern not only the immediate adaptability during the pandemic but also the potential long-term implications. The overarching question became whether these approaches were not just temporary solutions but integral components of the future of education and work.


Experiments in Talent Matching: Collaborations Between Students and Employers

The conversation was about practical experiments conducted in the field of talent matching, specifically focusing on collaborations between students and employers. These experiments were aimed at bridging the gap between academia and the professional world, exploring the potential of remote work in fostering meaningful connections.

Student-Employer Collaborations: The primary focus was on real-world applications, where students engaged remotely with employers and entrepreneurs. The objective was to identify the skills possessed by students and match them with the needs of the employers. It was outlined that this collaboration aimed not only to provide valuable work experience but also to gauge the effectiveness of remote work in producing tangible outcomes.

Case Study: The collaboration involved students actively working with Sylvia, contributing to projects remotely. The positive outcome was highlighted, with some students not only delivering impressive results but also securing paid positions with speaker Sylvia’s enterprise after graduation. This case study illustrated the practical viability of remote collaboration between students and employers.

Expanding the Experiment: The success of the initial experiments led to expansion of these collaborations. There was interest in inviting more entrepreneurs and organisations to participate, emphasising the mutual benefits for both students and employers. The term “contamination lab” was introduced, signifying the experimental nature of these collaborations and the diverse stakeholders involved.

Hybrid Work Model: One notable point was the recognition of the hybrid work model’s efficiency. Sylvia advocated for a balance between remote work and in-person collaboration, acknowledging the benefits of online work in terms of time efficiency and environmental sustainability. The emphasis was on achieving a “gray” hybrid effect that combined the strengths of both remote and in-person work.


Digitalised Systems in Education: The Intersection of Technology and Learning

Sky Walker’s Digitalised System

A prominent example discussed during this segment was Sky Walker, introduced as a startup in 2017 with a vision to create a digitalized system for managing education. The emphasis was on recognizing education’s dual nature, encompassing both content delivery and administrative processes. Sky Walker’s digitalized system aimed to streamline these aspects, bringing automation and efficiency into the educational domain.

Human-Centered Approach

A human-centered approach to technology was mentioned, emphasising that while technology serves as an instrument, humanity remains the driving force. The role of technology was framed as a tool to enhance human capabilities rather than replace them. This philosophy guided Sky Walker’s initiatives, aligning technology with human needs and perspectives.

Virtual Office and Remote Work

The discussion extended to practical applications, with the mention of Sky Walker’s virtual office. The virtual office served as a platform for remote collaboration, overcoming geographical barriers for students located in different towns. The success of the virtual office and remote work initiatives indicated the feasibility of conducting educational activities without physical presence.

AI in Education

A forward-looking aspect introduced was the incorporation of AI in education. A project called “AI Teach” was designed not to replace teachers but to support students. The AI was portrayed as a tool that stimulates critical thinking and facilitates learning without substituting human interaction. The emphasis was on using AI to assist in guiding students rather than providing ready-made solutions.

Balancing Life and Work

The digitalized systems were presented as a means to strike a balance between personal life and work. The virtual office allowed students to engage in smart activities remotely, reducing costs and environmental impact. The discussion touched upon the broader concept of work expectations during remote arrangements, addressing concerns about remote work being perceived as a vacation or creating challenges for those with limited resources.


The Role of Hybrid Work in Efficient Collaboration

They underlined the success of hybrid work models during the discussion. They pointed out that combining remote work with occasional in-person interactions not only saved time and resources but also contributed significantly to social and environmental sustainability. Real-world examples and practical experiences were cited to illustrate how this approach allowed for seamless collaboration without sacrificing crucial physical relationships.

Balancing Technology and In-Person Relationship

The overarching theme emphasised finding a harmonious balance between technology-driven collaboration and maintaining essential physical relationships. While acknowledging the efficiency of remote work, highlighted the irreplaceable value of face-to-face interactions, particularly in certain aspects of collaboration.


AI in Education: Data-Driven Talent Matching for Personalised Learning Paths

AI as a Supportive Tool

The core proposition revolved around AI serving as a supportive tool in education. During the presentation, the concept of “AI Teach,” was introduced, emphasizing that AI’s role was not to replace teachers but to assist students in their learning journeys. AI was positioned as a guide, providing guidance and posing questions to encourage students to actively explore and apply solutions.

Preserving Critical Thinking Skills

A crucial aspect discussed was the preservation of critical thinking skills. The speakers emphasized that AI should not provide ready-made solutions but rather stimulate students to think critically and explore different avenues. The goal was to maintain a balance, leveraging AI’s capabilities to enhance learning without diminishing the importance of human intellect.


Innovation in Education: A Case Study by Peter Oraya

Technology as a Bridge in Education: Peter Oraya shared a compelling example of how technology serves as a bridge in education, connecting learners globally. The case study highlighted instances where students, regardless of their geographical locations, could access educational resources and collaborate seamlessly. This exemplifies the transformative power of technology in breaking down traditional barriers to education.

The Impact of Virtual Learning Environments: A concrete example provided by Mr. Oraya centered around the impact of virtual learning environments. He detailed how these environments, enabled by technology, create opportunities for students to engage in collaborative learning despite being physically distant. The example showcased the effectiveness of virtual platforms in fostering interactive and dynamic educational experiences.

AI’s Role in Personalised Learning: The case study delved into the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in personalised learning paths. Mr. Oraya illustrated how AI can analyze individual learning patterns and tailor educational content accordingly. This concrete example emphasised the adaptability and customisation that AI brings to education, ensuring that each student receives targeted support based on their unique need.

Global Connectivity and Collaboration: One of the highlights from Peter Oraya’s story was the emphasis on global connectivity. He shared instances where students from diverse backgrounds could collaborate on projects and share perspectives. This example showcased how technology facilitates a globalised approach to education, enriching the learning experience through varied cultural inputs.

Challenges of Traditional Educational Models: Mr. Oraya provided a tangible example of the challenges associated with traditional educational models, particularly in the context of widespread access. The case study emphasised how traditional approaches limit accessibility, whereas technology-driven innovations can bridge gaps and provide education to a broader audience.

Technology as an Equalizer: A key takeaway from Mr. Oraya’s story was the notion of technology as an equalizer in education. The concrete examples underscored how technology levels the playing field, offering opportunities for learning and collaboration to individuals who might face geographical or resource-related constraints.


About the Speakers

Silvia Bernardini

Sylvia Bernardini is an Innovation Project Specialist known for her proficiency in developing complex projects across various domains. From associative initiatives to social and business projects, Sylvia collaborates within synergistic networks, emphasising shared values and meaningful productivity. With experience spanning metal mechanics, textiles, fashion, retail, food and beverage, and culture, she is motivated by the prospect of creating concrete and sustainable products and services.

Sylvia is dedicated to driving digital efficiency while always recognizing the importance of human guidance in technological processes. Whether influenced by her background in the metalworking industry or fueled by a genuine passion for science fiction, she approaches challenges with a perspective aimed at improvement and innovation. Sylvia’s distinctive trait is her ability to view things from different angles, seeking opportunities to enhance and share experiences with individuals eager to learn.

Massimiliano Ruzzedu

Massimiliano Ruzzeddu is a tenured researcher in sociology at the University Niccolò Cusano in Rome. His research interests cover a wide range, including social theory, epistemology, innovation studies, and globalization studies. His work delves into topics such as the use of Complexity Theories in sociological scholarship, cultural aspects of innovation, and changes in identity within the globalization process.

Some of his recent works include contributions to publications like “Women and Science: Models of Participation” in Advances in Gender and Cultural Research in Business and Economics (2019) and chapters like ‘The Complexity of Identity Building’ and ‘Hypothesis for a Sociology of Ignorance in the XXI century’ in Explaining Social Processes (2020). He has also explored the theme of ascribed identities in the global era with a complex approach in a publication titled “Ascribed Identities in the Global Era: A Complex Approach” in Contemporary Social Science (2021).

In addition to his research contributions, Massimiliano Ruzzeddu has been actively involved in teaching, conducting both academic and training-oriented courses for diverse audiences in terms of age and cultural backgrounds. He holds the position of co-editor in chief of the World Complexity Science Academy Journal and is a member of the managing board of both the World Complexity Science Academy (WCSA) and the Centre of European Research in Sustainable Innovation (CREIS).

Peter Oraya

Peter Oraya has extensive experience in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Storytelling, Big Data, Neural Networks, Blockchain, and Nanotechnology. As the Founder and CEO of Oxford Aptitude, he leads with a profound commitment to leveraging cutting-edge technologies to revolutionise various industries.

In the domain of AI and Machine Learning, Peter’s expertise extends to data-driven decision-making, where he favours the responsible and ethical use of technology.


An AI specialist, brought a wealth of knowledge to the discussion, particularly in the realm of artificial intelligence in education. With a focus on data-driven talent matching for personalised learning paths, Peter envisions the transformative role of AI. He highlights the importance of AI as a supportive tool rather than a replacement for traditional teaching methods. Peter delves into the potential of AI to guide students, encourage critical thinking, and revolutionise the education sector.

Building Bridges – Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents
Building Bridges – Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

In November 2023, the event “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success” unfolded as a beacon of insights, exploring the profound impact of researchers on startup innovation and the broader entrepreneurial landscape. This series of sessions, organised by the RAISE team and spearheaded by the International Consortium of Research Staff Associations (ICoRSA), was crafted to illuminate the indispensable role played by researchers in propelling real-world impact, fostering innovation, and nurturing talent within the dynamic startup ecosystem

At the heart of this series was Session 2: Building Bridges: Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents. This session, held on November 6, 2023, set out to explore crucial aspects of linking entrepreneurs with research talent, a nexus that fuels innovation and drives startup success. The agenda featured a rich tapestry of topics:

  • Navigating the Intersection: Unveiling the Role of Research Talent in Startup Success.
  • The Dynamics of Entrepreneur-Researcher Collaboration: Examining the Synergy.
  • Fostering Talent: Strategies for Nurturing Research Talent Development.
  • Policy Entrepreneurship: Shaping Research, Innovation, and Startups.
  • Connecting Startups with Investors: Exploring Commercial Development Opportunities.
  • How to Connect Entrepreneurs with Research Talent: A Practical Guide.
  • Key Elements for Successful Entrepreneur-Researcher Partnerships: Decoding the Formula.
  • Role of Networking: Linking Startups with Investors or Commercial Opportunities.
  • Best Practices: Bridging the Gap Between Startups and Potential Partners.

The session was graced by mentors provided by the RAISE project, adding an invaluable layer of expertise to the discussions. Adriana Bankston, a science policy and a former bench scientist, shared her insights. Alongside her, Juan Fernandez, an investor and representative for LALIGA in the Nordic Countries, brought his extensive experience to the table. Their guidance provided a compass for startups and researchers navigating the intricate landscape of collaboration and innovation.

1. Empowering the Next Generation: Connecting Entrepreneurs and Research Talents – Adriana Bankston

In a landscape where research seamlessly converges with entrepreneurship, the journey from academic endeavours to startup success is both challenging and transformative. Adriana Bankston, drawing from her academic background, sheds light on four key points that underscore the crucial connection between entrepreneurs and research talents.

Translating Research into Startups: A Journey from Lab to Market

Adriana emphasises the significance of translating research outcomes into tangible startups. Having witnessed students navigate this transformative journey from lab work to entrepreneurship, she highlights the need for a bridge between academic prowess and entrepreneurial acumen. The process involves not only recognising the potential commercial applications of research but also equipping students with the necessary resources and experiences.

The transition from academia to startups involves a paradigm shift. Recognising the gap between lab work and real-world applications, educational resources play a significant role. Exposing students to an entrepreneur curriculum and real-world experiences provides them with insights that go beyond the confines of the laboratory. This early exposure is critical in preparing them for the challenges and opportunities that entrepreneurship presents.

Developing Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking and Leadership

Beyond the technical expertise gained in a laboratory, this session underscores the importance of cultivating entrepreneurial skills. Critical thinking and leadership, often honed through practical experiences, become indispensable assets for individuals venturing into the entrepreneurial space.

Critical thinking and leadership are very important for succeeding in starting and running a business.. Adriana advocates for the early development of these skills, urging not just students but any trainees interested in startups to embark on a journey of skillset development. The ability to think critically and lead effectively enhances problem-solving capabilities and ensures a resilient approach in the face of challenges.

Encouraging Early Skill Set Development for Entrepreneurs

There is a need to encourage early skill development for individuals interested in startups. Beyond the confines of academic research, instilling entrepreneurial skills, critical thinking, and leadership qualities sets the stage for a more vibrant and innovative startup ecosystem.

Recognising the transformative potential of startups, encouragement to develop entrepreneurial skills starts early. Whether it’s students or other trainees, instilling an entrepreneurial mindset fosters adaptability and resilience. Early skill set development lays the foundation for a generation of entrepreneurs who are not just technically adept but also possess the essential qualities for navigating the complexities of startup environments.

The Role of Universities in Developing Training Programmes

In the pursuit of nurturing the next generation of entrepreneurs, there is a call for a proactive role for universities and the need for universities to develop more training programmes, citing the emergence of state-level programmes and regional forums that facilitate interactions between innovators and investors.

Universities play a significant role in shaping the entrepreneurial landscape. Adriana suggests that the development of more training programmes should be a priority. The existence of state-level programmes and regional forums showcases a growing recognition of the importance of early-stage entrepreneurial education. These initiatives, happening on campuses and even extending to High School accelerators, underscore the commitment needed to instill entrepreneurial skills at the grassroots level.

A cornerstone for driving innovation, propelling startups to success

These insights provide a roadmap for universities, students, and trainees to seamlessly transition from academic pursuits to the startup world. The synergy between research talents and entrepreneurship emerges as a cornerstone for driving innovation, propelling startups to success, and shaping a future generation of impactful entrepreneurs.

2. How can researchers contribute to startup success?

In the quest for startup success, researchers emerge as very significant contributors, offering unique perspectives and skills. Adriana Bankston identifies three key areas where researchers can significantly impact startup growth: Developing Talent, Recruiting, and Retaining. Let’s delve into each of these areas to uncover strategies for leveraging researchers’ potential.

Developing Talent: Fostering the Seeds of Innovation

It is of paramount importance to develop talent for the growth of startups. This echoes the parallel process in science policy, where young, talented individuals play a crucial role in making a real-world impact. The first consideration is understanding the specific talents needed for the startup’s growth and aligning them with the problem-solving goals. A critical aspect is the correlation between talent availability and ecosystem performance, transcending the impact on the startup itself to influence the entire ecosystem.

Recognising the right talent requires a profound understanding of the startup’s objectives. It involves aligning the talents with the unique challenges and problem-solving requirements. A thriving ecosystem attracts diverse talents, creating a symbiotic relationship where the startup benefits and, in turn, contributes to the ecosystem’s vibrancy.

Recruiting Talent: Bridging the Gap between Academia and Real-World Needs

The recruitment of talent becomes a critical juncture where the educational system and universities need to bridge the gap. Educational institutions might fall short in generating talents that meet the dynamic needs of startups. Connecting what is taught in the classroom with real-world applications is essential. Researchers, equipped with valuable knowledge, often struggle to translate and integrate into the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Hence, the challenge lies in selling the ecosystem to researchers, demonstrating the benefits and career advancements associated with plugging into it.

Recruiting talent demands a proactive approach to reshaping educational systems. Integrating real-world applications into academic training is essential. For startups, recognising the demand for talent in the global marketplace is crucial. The challenge, then, is to effectively communicate the opportunities and benefits to researchers, ensuring that they understand the tangible advantages of plugging into the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Retaining Talent: Navigating Policy Challenges and Practical Experiences

Retaining talent, especially foreign-born researchers, presents unique challenges, primarily in the policy and immigration space. Adriana highlights the policy and advocacy efforts required to create an environment conducive to retaining foreign talent. Beyond policy considerations, the focus shifts to practical experiences, educating researchers in the entrepreneurial process. The aim is to equip them with the skills necessary for entrepreneurial roles, even while still engaged in research.

Retaining talent involves advocating for policies that encourage foreign talent to stay and contribute to U.S. labs and startups. This entails addressing visa and immigration policies hindering the retention of foreign-born researchers. Simultaneously, fostering practical experiences and entrepreneurial education becomes paramount. The shift is from merely acknowledging the entrepreneurial nature of the research process to actively training researchers in entrepreneurial skills, creating a bridge between academia and entrepreneurial roles.

Startups to unlock the full potential of researchers

These insights provide a comprehensive framework for startups to unlock the full potential of researchers. By developing, recruiting, and retaining talent effectively, startups can not only thrive but also contribute to the dynamic ecosystems they inhabit. The emphasis on diversity in the talent pool and the transformative role of researchers in shaping entrepreneurial landscapes serves as a guiding beacon for startups seeking sustainable success.

3. Interdisciplinary Insights and Access to Research: Navigating the Startup-University Nexus

Three key points illuminate the dynamic interplay of interdisciplinary insights and access to research. This symbiotic relationship forms the crux of innovation, shaping the future of both academia and entrepreneurial endeavors.

University as the Nurturing Ground for Startup Ecosystems

Universities stand as the epicenter of the startup ecosystem, acting as vital contributors of talent and knowledge. Adriana highlights the profound connection between universities and startups, with many entrepreneurial ventures sprouting from university projects. Drawing from her experiences at the University of California, she underlines the role of federal funding, particularly in institutions like UCS, in fostering innovations. The excitement stems from the emergence of spin-off companies, often initiated by the creative endeavors of graduate students. Additionally, startups can tap into the support services provided by universities, creating a bridge between academia and practical applications.

The university’s role extends beyond academic pursuits, serving as a nurturing ground for the seeds of entrepreneurship. Federal funding acts as a catalyst, giving rise to innovations that transcend the confines of research labs. The enthusiasm is palpable when these ideas germinate into startup ventures, especially when spearheaded by the vibrant imaginations of young minds. The potential collaboration between startups and universities is  leveraging intellectual property and support services, thereby fostering an environment where innovation thrives.

Universities Promoting Startups: A Two-Way Street

The relationship between startups and universities isn’t one-sided. Startups, born from the innovative corridors of universities, have the power to bring these breakthroughs into practical application. Universities, in turn, play an important role in promoting startups, facilitating a dialogue around addressing grand challenges and global questions. The challenge lies in ensuring these startups receive the visibility they deserve, a realm where policy intervention becomes crucial.

The flow of ideas and innovations isn’t confined to the university’s boundaries. Startups emerge as conduits, translating these breakthroughs into tangible solutions for real-world challenges. Adriana points out the need for universities to actively promote startups, acknowledging their potential to address global issues. Policy advocacy becomes a linchpin, bridging the gap between innovation and awareness. The intersection of startups, universities, and policy serves as a powerful triad with the potential to reshape societal landscapes.

4. Enhancing Relationships: A Call for Collaborative Synergies

Working together is crucial for making the connection stronger between startups and universities. RAISE prompts thoughtful considerations about how universities promote startups, how startups benefit from research activities, and how this relationship can be improved. The onus lies not only on universities to push innovations from labs but also on startups to actively participate in leveraging synergies. The roundtable discussion becomes a space to delve into strategies for nurturing this intricate relationship.

The success of the startup-university relationship hinges on collaboration and thoughtful exploration of mutual benefits. Adriana’s questions spark introspection within the entrepreneurial and academic communities. How startups navigate the terrain of research, how universities champion their ventures, and the potential improvements in this relationship form the nucleus of this collaborative endeavor. The roundtable discussion emerges as a forum to unravel the intricacies and co-create a landscape where innovation thrives.

Guiding both startups and universities through interdisciplinary collaboration

These insights serve as a compass, guiding both startups and universities through the uncharted territories of interdisciplinary collaboration and access to research. The future of innovation lies in the seamless integration of these realms, where academia and entrepreneurship converge to shape a landscape of transformative possibilities.

5. Fostering Collaborations for Talent Acquisition

For startups, talent acquisition is not just about hiring individuals; it’s a strategic process involving networking and partnerships. Networking enables startups to tap into a wealth of skills and perspectives, vital for enhancing learning programs. Strategic partnerships, on the other hand, open doors to diverse industries, allowing startups to understand market dynamics and broaden their scope of innovation.

Networking for Skill Enrichment

Networking serves as a catalyst for talent acquisition, offering access to essential skills, knowledge, and diverse perspectives. By fostering networking opportunities, startups can enrich learning programs, addressing the evolving needs of aspiring entrepreneurs.

Strategic Partnerships for Industry Exposure

Strategic partnerships play a crucial role in exposing startups to diverse industries, broadening their horizons. Initiating collaborations through strategic partnerships provides startups with insights into different sectors, fostering innovation and adaptation.

Fostering Talents: Mentorship, Collaboration, and Interdisciplinary Approaches

To foster talents effectively, mentorship plays a significant role, guiding individuals not just within the research process but also in their broader career paths. Collaboration, both within and beyond universities, amplifies the impact of research, ensuring a holistic approach to knowledge and skill development. Embracing interdisciplinary approaches promotes the application of research in wider contexts, influencing societal change positively. Fostering a culture of collaboration is essential to break down silos and enhance the collective impact of research efforts.

Significance of Mentorship

Mentorship is a cornerstone for individuals navigating the research landscape, offering guidance beyond the project at hand. Mentors should not only guide during the research process but also help individuals leverage their talents in the real world post-graduation.

Collaboration Within and Beyond Universities

Collaboration within the university, including multi-PI research projects, enhances knowledge and skill development.

Encouraging collaboration outside university boundaries ensures researchers connect with diverse disciplines, leading to joint funding, recognition, and impactful outcomes.

Embracing Interdisciplinary Approaches

Interdisciplinary approaches encourage researchers to consider broader applications of their work. Collaboration with individuals from different disciplines not only integrates research into wider knowledge but also allows researchers to positively influence society.

6. Startups Connected to Researchers

These startups exemplify the dynamic synergy between researchers and entrepreneurs. Whether it’s decoding the human genome, revolutionizing cancer diagnostics, or using AI for drug development, these examples highlight the profound impact that startup ventures can achieve by connecting with researchers. In each case, the intersection of basic science and entrepreneurial innovation has paved the way for transformative solutions with broad societal implications.

1. Affinity Technology: Mapping the Human Genome

Affinity Technology focuses on mapping the human genome, identifying disease-causing mutations, and tailoring personalized treatments.

  • Connection to Researchers: Collaborating with academic researchers, the startup delves into the fundamental science of human genome mapping. Its technology is embraced by major pharmaceutical companies, showcasing how basic science questions can lead to groundbreaking solutions.

2. Grail: Revolutionizing Cancer Detection

Grail specializes in developing blood tests for cancer detection, utilizing DNA sequencing and machine learning.

  • Connection to Researchers: With strong ties to researchers, Grail’s innovation stems from collaboration in cancer research. The startup’s approach, backed by over one billion in investments from influencers like Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, exemplifies how niche research can have far-reaching implications for society.

3. In Silico Medicine: AI for Drug Development

Mission: In Silico Medicine employs AI to advance drug development, predicting how drugs interact with the human body and identifying targets for innovation.

  • Connection to Researchers: Partnering with major pharmaceutical companies like Pfizer and J&J, In Silico Medicine’s platform emerges from interdisciplinary collaboration. This startup illustrates that questions rooted in AI and drug development, once considered niche, can profoundly impact society when researchers and industry collaborate.

6. What are the strategies for talent development within the research community?

Nurturing talent within the research community involves a multifaceted approach, from recruitment to continuous development. By aligning goals, providing targeted skill development, and incorporating feedback loops, organisations and mentors can create an environment conducive to the growth and success of researchers in their careers.

1. Recruit the Best Pool: Identifying and hiring the most promising talents within the research community is crucial. This involves defining what “the best” means for your specific goals and the qualities you seek in potential team members.

2. Skill Transition Programmes: Facilitate programmes and systems that equip researchers with skills essential for transitioning into new roles. This is especially vital for mentors and collaborators to consider, ensuring a smooth transition for researchers post-graduation.

3. Solicit Feedback from Researchers: Regularly seek feedback from researchers about existing initiatives. Understanding their perspectives and insights can shed light on areas for improvement and help tailor talent development strategies more effectively.

4. Clearcut Path Development: Collaborate with researchers to establish a clear path for career development. This involves outlining achievable milestones, setting expectations, and providing guidance on navigating career trajectories within and beyond academia.

5. Coaching and Mentoring Programmes: Implement coaching and mentoring programmes to offer guidance and support throughout the researchers’ career journeys. These initiatives aim to foster a supportive environment and help individuals navigate challenges.

6. Leadership Development Opportunities: Introduce leadership development programmes tailored to researchers. While often overlooked, cultivating leadership skills is essential for researchers to take on influential roles within and outside academia.

7. Feedback Mechanisms: Establish channels for ongoing feedback, ensuring that researchers can express their thoughts on existing programs and suggest improvements. This two-way communication fosters a culture of continuous improvement.

8. Skills Gap Analysis: Conduct a skills gap analysis to pinpoint the disparity between current skills and desired outcomes. This strategic evaluation informs the development of targeted training programmes and mentoring initiatives.

9. Experiential Learning Opportunities: Integrate experiential learning opportunities into talent development programmes. This hands-on approach enhances researchers’ practical skills, making them better equipped to succeed in their research projects and future endeavours.

7. The Role of Policy Entrepreneurship in Research and Innovation

Policy entrepreneurship involves dynamic individuals actively collaborating within government structures to drive policy innovations. While similar to traditional entrepreneurship, this field specifically focuses on shaping government policies to foster positive changes in various domains, including research and innovation.

While policy entrepreneurship often involves influencing government policies to benefit research and innovation, it’s essential to recognise that governments, in turn, can influence startups and universities. Initiatives aimed at improving the startup ecosystem highlight a reciprocal relationship between policy changes and entrepreneurial success.

Policy entrepreneurship is a dynamic force that can reshape the landscape of research, innovation, and startups. By framing challenges, fostering advocacy, leading by example, and efficiently utilising resources, policy entrepreneurs play a significant role in creating positive societal changes and fostering a culture of innovation.

Key Components of Policy Entrepreneurship

1. Framing a Problem: Entrepreneurs identify and articulate societal challenges that align with their expertise. In the context of research and innovation, this could involve recognising issues in existing policies or proposing novel solutions to address emerging problems.

2. Network Utilisation and Advocacy: Leveraging networks, entrepreneurs collaborate with advocacy coalitions to gain support for their policy ideas. This collaborative effort helps create a collective voice for change and facilitates the implementation of innovative policies.

3. Leading by Example: Successful policy entrepreneurs lead by example, embodying the qualities necessary for driving change. Their actions and initiatives demonstrate the feasibility and impact of proposed policy innovations.

4. Efficient Resource Deployment: Recognising limited resources, entrepreneurs deploy available resources efficiently. In the realm of research and innovation, this could involve optimising funding allocation, avoiding research waste, and maximising the return on investment (ROI).

5. Scaling Up for Societal Impact: Once a viable solution is identified, policy entrepreneurs focus on scaling up their initiatives to achieve a broader societal impact. This involves expanding the reach and influence of innovative policies beyond initial implementations.

Applications in Fostering Innovation

Federal Assistance for Innovation: FAS (Federation of American Scientists) collaborates with the federal government to foster innovation by generating new ideas and creating impactful programs. The aim is to improve science, efficiently use limited resources, and enhance the competitiveness of the United States.

Government Influence on Startups and Universities

Startup Support Policies: Governments recognise the importance of startups for job creation and technological advancement. Policy changes, including tax incentives, grants, and loans, aim to ease the challenges faced by startups, particularly in accessing capital during early stages.

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Programme: The SBIR program allocates federal funds specifically to small businesses, emphasizing the government’s commitment to supporting innovation within these enterprises.

Federation of American Scientists (FAS): Policy Entrepreneurship, Turning Ideas into Action

FAS is a nonprofit organisation based in DC with a rich history rooted in national security questions. Evolving over the years, its mission broadened to embed science, technology, innovation, and expertise into government and public discourse. The overarching goal is to contribute to building a healthy, safe, prosperous, and equitable society.

Day One Project

FAS, through its Day One Project, exemplifies the transformative power of policy entrepreneurship. By actively engaging with experts and emerging voices, it has become a driving force in shaping policies that contribute to a more innovative, equitable, and prosperous society.

Day One Project: The Day One Project, initiated in 2019, was initially geared towards influencing the election agenda. However, its resilience and adaptability have made it an ongoing avenue for making tangible changes in policies related to science and innovation.

  • Democratising Policy Making: The project focuses on transforming policy from a mere noun to an actionable verb. Its core objective is to democratise the policymaking process by actively engaging with both new and expert voices. Through collaboration with early-career scientists and seasoned experts, the project aims to generate actionable policies.

Examples of Policy Impact

GSA Digital Corps Fellowship: Advocated for government investment in training early-career technologists through a digital corps fellowship programme.

  • Outcome: The memo led to the creation of the GSA Digital Corps Fellowship, launched in 2021, fostering collaboration between researchers and government officials.

Sustainable Aviation: Addressing the electrification of aviation.

  • Outcome: Ideas from the memo were included in the White House fact sheet in September 2021, outlining actions for sustainable aviation.

Broadband for Schools: Urged government action to close the digital divide in schools by increasing funding for the Federal Communications Commission’s E-Rate programme.

  • Outcome: The policy proposal resulted in a legislative change, injecting $7 billion into the programme through the American Rescue Plan in 2021.

AI Research Institutes: Proposed investments in AI research.

  • Outcome: The National Science Foundation announced the establishment of 11 National AI Research Institutes, with a $220 million investment in 2021.

The Impact of Memos: The Day One Project’s database showcases over 300 memos, some of which have directly influenced legislative or executive branch actions. The project acts as a catalyst for translating ideas into tangible policy changes.

Exploring Ideas on Day One Project: Those interested can explore the Day One Project website, which serves as a fascinating database of ideas and policy proposals. The diverse range of topics covered in the memos may spark new ideas and perspectives.


Success in Startups: The Power of Thought Leadership and Content Marketing

Juan, a seasoned professional in the startup ecosystem, recently shared valuable insights during a session on leveraging thought leadership and content marketing for startup success. Let’s break down the key takeaways from his engaging talk.

Startup Challenges: Juan discusses the difficulties startups face in getting the resources they need to grow, such as money and support. They point out the struggle of finding these resources and how it can be a big hurdle for startups.

Thought Leadership Strategies: Juan suggests that startups can overcome these challenges by using something called “thought leadership strategies.” These strategies involve showing that the startup is an expert in its field and can lead others. This, according to Juan, is a way for startups to grow not just locally but internationally.

Examples of Success: To illustrate their point, Juan shares examples from their own investments. They talk about how helping startups build a strong personal and professional brand has been beneficial. This branding, they explain, plays a significant role in the success of startups, both in terms of their business and their personal achievements.

80% of the results come from just 20% of the efforts

In the startup world, there’s a wise saying from an Italian philosopher named Pareto, who came up with the Pareto Principle. It says that 80% of the results come from just 20% of the efforts. This idea is crucial, especially for startups in their early stages when there’s not much money, people, or time:

Limited Resources: At the beginning of a startup’s life, there’s not a lot of money, people, or budget. Juan emphasized the need to focus on what really matters.

1. Target the Vital 20%: To make the most impact with limited resources, Juan suggests concentrating efforts on the 20% of things that bring 80% of the results. This means prioritising tasks and events that truly make a difference for the startup.

2. Overcoming Obstacles: mMany startups often face challenges like lack of time or pressure. To address this, they encourage startups to leverage technology for developing commercial and fundraising strategies without spending money or leaving their homes.

3. Strategic Use of Technology: Startups are advised to use technology cleverly to create effective strategies. This could involve using online platforms and tools to reach a broader audience, plan events, and raise funds without incurring additional costs.

Startups can optimise their efforts and achieve more significant outcomes

Juan’s advice centers on the importance of being smart and selective when resources are scarce. By applying the Pareto Principle, startups can optimize their efforts and achieve more significant outcomes, even with limited resources. The emphasis on technology highlights the potential for startups to develop strategies efficiently, making progress from anywhere, whether it’s a home office or a co-working space.

Power of Thought Leadership in Simple Terms

In the vast world of business, a thoughtful strategy called “thought leadership” is gaining prominence. Let’s break down what Juan is sharing, step by step:

1. The Essence of Thought Leadership: Thought leadership strategy revolves around content marketing. This means creating and sharing valuable content. Recent statistics highlight the significance of content marketing in big companies. For instance, 43% of marketers found customers through LinkedIn.

2. The 80/20 Rule in Content Marketing: In content marketing, there is a rule: focus 80% on creating content and only 20% on selling. It’s like a recipe for success. Juan follows this strategy in their professional life, sharing content 20% of the time and selling 20% of the time.

3. Building Trust through Content: While it may not lead to immediate deals, Juan believes this approach generates trust. Interesting content makes startups and investors see you not just as a seller but as a “thought leader.” Being seen as a thought leader boosts sales and helps in raising funds for startups.

4. Applying Marketing Principles to Yourself: Juan suggests applying marketing principles, like the marketing funnel, to oneself. This means creating awareness about what you do and your industry. By consistently generating content, you become a regular presence in people’s minds, leading to consideration, conversion, and loyalty.

5. Strategic Content Creation: More Than Just Selling

Juan also stressed the significance of content creation beyond self-promotion. Rather than incessantly pushing one’s startup, the strategy involves sharing industry news, market trends, and personal stories. This multifaceted approach aims to humanize founders in the B2B environment and foster genuine connections with the audience.  

6. Real-Life Examples: Juan, working for the Spanish football league in Denmark, uses this strategy to impact markets in a B2B environment. They generate awareness not just locally but also in Sweden, Norway, and Finland. On a personal level, their investment strategy reaps benefits. Startups approach them to be an investor just because of their online presence, without the need for physical appearances at events.

7. Becoming an Industry Expert: It’s not just about selling; it’s about communicating news, trends, and valuable content to the ecosystem. Sharing not only industry-related content but also personal stories humanizes oneself, making connections more meaningful. In the ever-evolving world of startups, being recognized as an industry expert can open doors to valuable connections with fellow investors and venture capitalists. This not only benefits the individual but also adds substantial value to the startups associated with them. Juan emphasized the importance of strategically positioning oneself as a sector expert to build a robust ecosystem.

8. Leveraging Technology and Language: Juan uses generative AI to create content efficiently. They stress the importance of communicating in a global language, even if you are local. Speaking in English, in their case, has helped in expanding internationally and connecting with a broader ecosystem.

8.1. Harnessing the Power of AI in Content Creation

Acknowledging the role of technology in modern content creation, Juan advocated for using generative AI to produce engaging content. The emphasis on communicating in a global language, such as English, was highlighted as a strategic move for startups aiming to expand internationally.

8.2 LinkedIn Algorithm Hacks

Navigating the intricacies of the LinkedIn algorithm, Juan shared practical tips for optimal visibility. Natural language, regular posting (three times a week), and timely content related to industry trends were recommended. Juan also cautioned against content saturation and highlighted the importance of post timing during the early hours of the day.

8.3 Building Networks: From Shyness to Strategic Connections

Overcoming shyness in networking was addressed with a compelling argument – if you don’t connect, your competitors will. The strategy involves adding key individuals on LinkedIn, not necessarily for immediate sales but to establish a connection. The session stressed the value of thoroughly understanding potential connections to initiate meaningful conversations.

8.4 Maximising LinkedIn Presence: No More Business Cards

The traditional business card was deemed less trendy, with Juan advocating for directing people to LinkedIn profiles instead. By promoting LinkedIn profiles at events and organizational representations, individuals can gradually expose their connections to expert content.

9. Communication for Founders and Startups: Founders and startups are encouraged to communicate as much as possible. It’s not just about talking about the project; it’s about generating value for others through various types of content.

In a nutshell, Juan’s strategy revolves around creating valuable content, building trust, and positioning oneself as an industry expert. This approach not only benefits their professional role but also amplifies the impact of startups and investments in a dynamic and ever-evolving business landscape.

Guide for Startups: Applying the Marketing Funnel for Success

Embarking on the journey of startup success requires a strategic approach. One powerful strategy, as highlighted by the speaker, is applying the marketing funnel. Here’s a comprehensive guide for startups:

1. Awareness

Founder’s Persona: As a founder, envision yourself as a brand. Generate awareness about your industry and startup by consistently engaging with your audience.

Content is Key: Develop a content strategy that aligns with your industry. Regularly share valuable content through various channels to create a continuous presence.

2. Consideration

Building Connections: Actively engage with your audience. Respond to comments, messages, and connect with professionals in your industry.

Networking: Attend relevant events, both physically and virtually. Networking is essential to fostering consideration among potential clients, partners, and investors.

3. Conversion

Building Trust: Through your content and interactions, focus on building trust. Share success stories, testimonials, and case studies that showcase your startup’s credibility.

Personal Branding: Elevate your personal brand by sharing your journey, experiences, and industry insights. This personal touch can significantly impact the conversion process.

4. Loyalty

Consistency is Key: Continue your content strategy even after initial conversions. Stay consistent in sharing updates, industry news, and maintaining an active presence.

Value-Driven Approach: Provide ongoing value to your audience. This can include exclusive insights, offers, or access to resources that keep your audience engaged and loyal.

5. LinkedIn Strategies

Optimizing Your Profile: Ensure your LinkedIn profile reflects your startup’s vision and your personal journey. Use a professional yet approachable tone.

Content Sharing: Leverage LinkedIn’s algorithm by sharing content regularly. Follow the recommended frequency and timing for optimal visibility.

Strategic Networking: Connect with professionals, investors, and potential clients. Use LinkedIn to enhance your networking efforts, building a valuable ecosystem around your startup.

6. International Expansion

Remote Work Dynamics: Exploit new co-working dynamics. Work remotely to explore and enter new markets. Attend events virtually or physically to establish your startup internationally.

Global Communication: If thinking long term, communicate in English, even if your startup is local. Utilize technology and language to break into global markets effectively.

7. Research and Connection

Personalized Outreach: Before reaching out to key individuals, conduct thorough research. Identify commonalities or shared interests to establish a personalized connection.

Relationship Building: Initiate conversations without an immediate sales pitch. Building relationships takes time, and a genuine connection can lead to fruitful partnerships.

8. Institutional Resources

Leverage Institutional Support: Explore resources offered by institutions relevant to your industry and international expansion. These resources can provide market insights, contacts, and support for your startup’s growth.

9. Success Stories

Learn from Examples: Study successful startups that have effectively applied the marketing funnel. Understand their content strategies, international approaches, and networking techniques.

Applying the marketing funnel is not a one-time effort; it’s a continuous, strategic process. By focusing on awareness, consideration, conversion, and loyalty, startups can create a robust foundation for success. Personal branding, content consistency, and thoughtful networking play pivotal roles in building a startup’s credibility and international presence.


The Q&A discussion and key recommendations

Investment Thesis: The mentors and participants emphasized the importance of aligning with the investor’s thesis. Startups should carefully study and understand the preferences and focus areas of potential investors to increase the likelihood of securing funding.

Digital Presence and Branding: Startups should actively manage their digital presence, particularly on platforms like LinkedIn. A strong online presence, including regular updates and achievements, enhances credibility and builds trust with potential investors.

People Over Ideas: The mentors and participants emphasize that many investors prioritize the team and the individuals behind the startup over the idea itself. Investors often look for skills, potential, and the right attitude in founders. The ability to sell oneself through online platforms can be a competitive advantage.

Globalization and Talent: The rapid expansion of technology and globalization have made it easier for startups to access talent from different countries. Platforms for freelancers and professionals allow startups to build diverse and specialized teams, making idea implementation more feasible.

Integration and Trust Building in Europe: The European market is considered more risk-averse due to fragmentation in economies, laws, and languages. The speaker advocates for more integration among European startup ecosystems, fostering trust and collaboration. Initiatives like investment networks and partnerships can contribute to building this trust.

Government Support and Legislation: There is an increasing awareness of the role of governments in supporting startups, with discussions on improving tax structures and legislation to encourage entrepreneurship. Startups should be aware of regional disparities in available resources and opportunities.

Diversity and Inclusion: The conversation touches on the importance of diversity in the startup ecosystem. Initiatives and discussions surrounding diversity are gaining prominence, emphasizing the need for inclusivity in entrepreneurship.

The discussion highlighted key differences in the cultural approach to entrepreneurship between Europe and North America, particularly in terms of risk-taking and support systems. In Europe, there seems to be a more cautious approach, with a preference for gaining experience in established companies before venturing into startups. In contrast, the U.S. fosters a more entrepreneurial mindset from the early stages.

Larisa, a founder based in Germany, emphasized the importance of belief in one’s idea and a relentless commitment to making it work. Her successful startup journey involved leveraging her professional experience, combining technology with commercial insights, and maintaining a strong belief in sustainability.

The conversation also touched upon the challenges faced by angel investors in Europe, with a need for greater awareness and education about the benefits and risks of angel investments. There was a call for collaboration between startup founders, universities, and investors to foster a more open innovation ecosystem.

In terms of connecting with universities for knowledge transfer, it was suggested to take a proactive approach by reaching out to tech transfer offices, connecting with teachers, and involving students in real cases. The importance of universities adapting their educational programs to be more practical, case-oriented, and collaborative with industry stakeholders was also emphasized.

Recommendations

  • Encourage a more entrepreneurial mindset in European cultures.
  • Promote awareness and education about angel investments.
  • Foster collaboration between startups, universities, and investors.
  • Proactively connect with universities for knowledge transfer.
  • Advocate for more practical and industry-oriented educational programs at universities.
  • Participants were encouraged to join the Open Startup Forum LinkedIn group for further networking and discussions.

About the Speakers and Mentors

Adriana Bankston

Adriana Bankston is a former bench scientist turned science policy expert, with a wealth of experience in research and academic policy changes within university settings. Her career was dedicated to showcasing research discoveries on a broader scale. Notably, Adriana also led a non-profit organisation and held various entrepreneurial roles, connecting with professionals worldwide.

Adriana Bankston

Adriana’s role as a senior fellow in science policy with the Federation of American Scientists showcased her expertise in policy entrepreneurship. Her work at this non-profit mirrored the dynamic nature of a startup, making her well-equipped to discuss the convergence of science and policy.

Based in Washington, DC, USA, Adriana was ideally positioned to offer valuable insights into research-powered innovation, real-world impact, and the art of building strategic partnerships and talent scouting. Her diverse background and passion for research made her a dynamic speaker for discussions surrounding innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

To learn more about Adriana:


Juan Fuentes Fernández

Juan Fuentes Fernández

Juan Fuentes Fernández, based in Copenhagen, is a seasoned expert with a career spanning over a decade in various areas, including strategy, international business development, PR & Comms, brand and activation management, project and people management, market research, and CSR.

Having worked across Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, Juan’s global perspective is reflected in his extensive professional journey. His notable achievements include:


Professional Experience

  • LALIGA Delegate for the Nordic Countries (2021-Present): Appointed by LALIGA, the Spanish football league, Juan leads the growth strategy in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland.
  • LALIGA Delegate for the Middle East (2017-2021): Spearheaded LALIGA’s successful expansion in Egypt, Sudan, and Libya.
  • Editor at Oxford Business Group (Philippines): Analyzed emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Trade and Investment Advisor for the Embassy of Spain: Represented Spanish interests in Egypt, Lebanon, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Djibouti.

Academic Involvement: Juan’s academic contributions include research and co-authoring a Working Paper for Harvard Business School on LALIGA’s strategic development. He has served as an instructor and master thesis supervisor in various sports management programs in Spain and Europe.

Angel Investor: As an investor, Juan focuses on sports and entertainment-related startups, emphasizing industry validation and expansion. He avoids investments in projects collaborating with LALIGA or seeking collaboration with his organization.

Multidisciplinary Project Coordination: Juan has successfully managed diverse teams for award-winning projects, such as the Spanish-Arabic football dictionary by the Instituto Cervantes and LALIGA, which received the “Publication of the Year 2021” award in Spain.

Recognition and Social Impact: Juan has been shortlisted as a winner in Spain’s inaugural Nova 111 list, particularly in the telecom, media, and entertainment category. Dedicated to social impact, he has volunteered with various NGOs for over a decade and is a member of Common Goal, donating 1% of his salary to support social causes.

Areas of Expertise: Juan Fuentes Fernández excels in entertainment and sports management, international business development, strategy, market research, PR & Comms, brand and activation management, project and people management, CSR initiatives, academic instruction, keynote speaking, and angel investment. His multilingual and multicultural proficiency further enhances his ability to make a significant impact across various sectors.

The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation
The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation 1024 576 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

RAISE organised four events, bringing together researchers and members of the startup ecosystem. These events facilitated matchmaking services, connecting research talent and mentors with startups, scale-ups, startup accelerators, and investors. The pilot actions encouraged scale-ups to showcase their concepts, creating opportunities for impactful ventures and global market matchmaking. 

The first event was held on November 3, 2023  on “The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation,” and explored and highlighted the significant influence of researchers in driving innovation within startup ecosystems. The session aimed to provide insights, strategies, and examples showcasing how researchers contribute to pushing the boundaries of knowledge and innovation in the startup landscape with key tactics, recommendations, and real-world examples.

1. Valuable skills researchers possess and their potential impact on the startup ecosystem

In the dynamic landscape of startups, the collaboration between researchers and entrepreneurs brings a unique set of skills to the table. From problem-solving prowess to creative thinking, researchers contribute significantly to the success and innovation of startups. These are the valuable skills researchers possess and how they can make a substantial impact on the startup ecosystem:

Problem-Solving Expertise

Researchers are adept at identifying problems and developing effective solutions. Their ability to analyse complex issues and generate innovative ideas makes them invaluable assets in the fast-paced startup environment. In startups, where challenges often arise at an accelerated pace, the problem-solving skills of researchers become a critical factor in overcoming obstacles and driving progress.

Creative Thinking

Creative thinking is a shared trait between researchers and startup enthusiasts. Both groups thrive on generating novel ideas, making connections, and exploring new possibilities. Researchers, drawing on their research background, bring a wealth of knowledge and creativity to the startup space. This is particularly crucial in an environment where adaptability and out-of-the-box thinking can make the difference between success and failure.

Research Expertise

While it might seem obvious, the research expertise of individuals is a potent tool that extends far beyond academia. Researchers, trained in specific fields, can apply their knowledge to address challenges in startups. This expertise becomes particularly relevant when communicating with policymakers, as startups navigate the complex landscape of regulations and policy considerations. Researchers, with their deep understanding of scientific principles, become instrumental in communicating with policymakers. This skill is not only crucial in the policy world but also applicable in startups, where regulatory compliance is essential for sustainable growth. The ability to delve deep into a subject and extract valuable insights is a transferable skill. Entrepreneurs can tap into this expertise for informed decision-making and problem-solving.

2. Bridging the Gap: How Researchers Propel Innovation from Lab to Startup

In the ever-evolving landscape of research and innovation, the journey from laboratory discovery to real-world application is a critical process. Researchers play a pivotal role in pushing the boundaries of knowledge and translating their findings into impactful innovations. This content piece delves into the parallels between the research process and the startup world, exploring how researchers can contribute to the thriving ecosystem of innovation.

Creativity in Research and Startups

The research process, characterised by creativity and systematic exploration, shares common ground with the chaotic and dynamic nature of startups. Researchers continuously iterate on ideas, conduct experiments, and seek innovative outcomes. However, transitioning from the structured research environment to the fast-paced world of startups requires a mindset shift to navigate the unpredictability and embrace the chaos inherent in entrepreneurial ventures.

The Role of Tech Transfer Offices

Tech transfer offices act as crucial intermediaries, facilitating the translation of research into marketable innovations. Researchers seeking to commercialise their work can benefit from engaging with these offices. They offer guidance on product development, potential collaborations, and the necessary steps to transform a research project into a startup venture.

Collaborations with Industry

Collaborating with industry partners is essential for researchers looking to bridge the gap between academia and real-world applications. These collaborations provide access to funding, global markets, and industry expertise. Researchers should explore partnerships that align with the goals of their research and have the potential to drive innovation.

Developing Entrepreneurial Skills

Transitioning from academia to entrepreneurship requires researchers to develop entrepreneurial skills. This includes understanding how to navigate the startup ecosystem, pitch ideas, and maintain the momentum of a fledgling company. Recognizing the transferable skills gained through research, such as critical thinking and problem-solving, can empower researchers to thrive in the entrepreneurial space.

Hot Topics and Global Relevance

Researchers should stay attuned to hot topics and societal needs, considering how their discoveries can address pressing issues. Whether it’s environmental challenges, health innovations, or other critical areas, aligning research with global relevance enhances the potential for impactful innovations. Understanding the ever-changing landscape of societal needs informs researchers on where their contributions can make a substantial difference.

Real-World Impact

Practical implications of research findings are integral to the translation of knowledge into real-world impact. Researchers must consider the broader implications of their work, similar to the policy space. Practical considerations include funding, stakeholders, and the potential positive or negative impacts on various sectors.

Clinical Trials and Health Innovations

In the current context, health innovations, especially in the realm of clinical trials, hold significant promise. Researchers should explore avenues where their discoveries can contribute to advancements in healthcare. The creation of new agencies and increased focus on health-related initiatives provide ample opportunities for researchers to turn their ideas into innovative companies.

Bridging the gap between research and startups requires researchers to embrace the challenges and opportunities that come with translating knowledge into innovation. Tech transfer offices, industry collaborations, and a focus on societal needs play crucial roles in this transformative process. As researchers embark on this journey, they contribute not only to the advancement of knowledge but also to the creation of impactful solutions that shape the future.

3. Transforming Research into Societal Solutions

The journey from research laboratories to real-world applications is a critical process that drives innovation and benefits society at large. This content piece explores how research translates into practical solutions with a focus on four key points. Drawing examples from the Science Coalition’s report on sparking economic growth, we delve into the societal impact of research-driven startups.

Diverse Funding Sources and Support

The translation of research into practical solutions often depends on the topic, the spaces involved, and the stakeholders interested in supporting it. Federal funding, whether from agencies or philanthropic sources, plays a crucial role. The Science Coalition emphasizes the link between federal funding, job creation, and economic growth. This comprehensive approach goes beyond creating startups, highlighting the broader societal benefits.

  • Example: Ventilators and Respirators – Instruments, a California-based startup, improved respirators for COVID-19 patients, showcasing how research-backed innovations can address urgent societal needs.

Societal Value and Legislative Perspectives

Understanding the societal value of research-driven startups is vital when engaging with legislators. Different legislators may prioritise job creation, economic development, or other factors. Recognizing these intersections helps researchers advocate for funding aligned with legislators’ interests.

  • Example: Autism Education – Autism Navigator in Florida focuses on education, developing tools to teach families about autism, emphasising the societal impact of startups beyond medical solutions.

Environmental and Climate Innovations

The ever-popular topics of climate and environment provide fertile ground for research-driven startups. Innovations in environmental solutions, such as tools for groundwater treatment, showcase the potential far-reaching implications for societal benefit.

  • Example: Groundwater Treatment – Airlift Environmental, a Nebraska-based startup, develops a pump for treating contaminated groundwater, addressing critical environmental challenges.

Entrepreneurial Mindset and Skill Development

Transitioning from research to entrepreneurship requires the development of an entrepreneurial mindset. Researchers must cultivate skills necessary for startup success, including networking, pitching ideas, and navigating the dynamic startup ecosystem.

  • Example: Education and Support – Various programs and initiatives, such as those offered by FAS (Faculty of Arts and Sciences), contribute to skill development and mindset transformation, enabling researchers to thrive in entrepreneurial roles.

Research-driven startups are catalysts for societal change

Research-driven startups are catalysts for societal change, offering practical solutions to pressing issues. By diversifying funding sources, understanding legislative perspectives, addressing environmental challenges, and fostering an entrepreneurial mindset, researchers can contribute to the translation of knowledge into impactful innovations. These examples showcase the wide-ranging societal benefits that emerge when research transforms into tangible solutions, emphasising the importance of continued support for research-driven entrepreneurship.

4. Bridging the Gap: Nurturing Entrepreneurial Roles for Research Impact

As researchers navigate the intricate landscape of turning research into impactful solutions, the development of an entrepreneurial mindset becomes crucial. In this context piece, we explore the entrepreneurial process, emphasising its iterative nature, the importance of thorough research, and the parallel skills required for both research and entrepreneurship.

Iterative Nature of Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship shares common ground with research in its iterative nature. While both involve problem-solving, entrepreneurs operate in an environment with less certainty, constantly seeking opportunities and building their own reputation. The emphasis on profits and the need to navigate a dynamic landscape set entrepreneurship apart, requiring a unique skill set.

  • Example: Venturing into Startups – Startups often embody the iterative nature of entrepreneurship. A company like Instruments, based in California, iteratively improved respirators for COVID-19 patients, showcasing the adaptability and problem-solving skills essential for entrepreneurial success.

Thorough Research as a Foundation

Research is not only a prerequisite for academic success but is also fundamental to entrepreneurial endeavours. Entrepreneurs must conduct extensive research before venturing into the market, ensuring their ideas are novel, valuable, and address existing gaps. Research becomes the bedrock upon which entrepreneurs build their innovative solutions.

  • Example: Educational Tools for Autism – Autism Navigator in Florida exemplifies the importance of thorough research. By developing tools to educate families about autism, they not only addressed a societal need but also conducted research to ensure the effectiveness of their educational approach.

Entrepreneurial Identity and Skill Development

Cultivating an entrepreneurial identity involves understanding the motivations behind venturing into entrepreneurship. The journey parallels the scientific identity, as both require individuals to continuously innovate and build projects. Working in entrepreneurial roles, whether as a CEO or part of a startup, contributes to skill development that is essential for entrepreneurial success.

  • Example: Journal of Science Policy and Governance – Serving as the CEO for the Journal of Science Policy and Governance provides individuals with a unique entrepreneurial experience. The role involves leveraging published work through conferences, panels, and media engagement, fostering skills in communication, networking, and impact assessment.

The journey from research to impactful solutions requires researchers to embrace an entrepreneurial mindset. Whether through submitting policy memos, engaging with legislators, or leading roles in research-driven startups, individuals can bridge the gap between research findings and societal impact. By understanding the iterative nature of entrepreneurship, conducting thorough research, and developing an entrepreneurial identity, researchers can contribute to transformative solutions that benefit society.

5. Biotech Startups Transforming Research into Solutions

Biotech startups are at the forefront of leveraging groundbreaking research to bring about transformative solutions in various fields. In this piece, we delve into case studies highlighting how these startups are revolutionising neurology, tissue regeneration, biosupply therapies, bioprinting, and precision agriculture.

Neurology: NotLabs – Precision Medicine Revolution

Innovation: NotLabs has pioneered precision medicine for brain disorders by developing remote-controlled micro-robots. These micro-robots offer a revolutionary approach to diagnosing and treating brain disorders, showcasing the power of precision medicine in the neurology space.

Impact: The ability to remotely navigate micro-robots introduces a new dimension to brain disorder treatment, promising more precise and effective interventions.

Tissue Regeneration: Biosupply Therapies

Innovation: Biosupply Therapies focuses on tissue regeneration and alternative splicing of stem cells to prevent various diseases. Their research extends to regenerating cells in aging individuals, presenting a holistic approach to addressing health challenges associated with aging.

Impact: The company’s innovative therapies offer potential solutions for a myriad of diseases, providing hope for improved health outcomes and enhanced quality of life.

Bioprinting: Advancements in 3D-Printed Human Tissues

Innovation: Bioprinting companies, with a standout example, are actively creating human tissues for medical research and therapy applications. The technology involves 3D printing of organs, offering possibilities for revolutionary advancements in the field of healthcare.

Impact: Bioprinting holds the potential to transform the field of organ transplantation and medical research, providing researchers and clinicians with unprecedented tools to understand and treat diseases.

Precision Agriculture: Climate Corporation – Data-Driven Farming

Innovation: Climate Corporation harnesses data analytics to provide farmers with valuable insights for crop yield improvement. Their precision agriculture approach involves analyzing weather patterns to enable data-driven decision-making for farmers.

Impact: By optimising crop management through data analysis, Climate Corporation contributes to sustainable agriculture, impacting everything from food production to the overall agricultural workforce.

These case studies exemplify the potential of biotech startups in translating research into impactful solutions. From precision medicine in neurology to innovative therapies for tissue regeneration and 3D-printing human tissues, these startups are reshaping industries and offering novel approaches to longstanding challenges. As research continues to drive innovation, biotech startups play a crucial role in bridging the gap between scientific discoveries and real-world applications.

6. Fostering Innovation: The Crucial Link Between Researchers and Startups

We explored the dynamics of fostering innovation through collaborations between researchers and startups. Adriana’s insights shed light on the vital role universities play in providing knowledge, talent, and resources that can be leveraged by startups. Let’s delve into the five key points discussed and explore specific examples.

Universities as Knowledge Hubs

Universities produce valuable knowledge that can be widely leveraged. Collaboration with industry, especially startups, acts as a bridge between theoretical knowledge and practical solutions.

  • Example: Research institutions collaborating with biotech startups to advance medical discoveries.

Innovation Funding

Adequate funding is essential for turning research into impactful innovations. Universities can provide facilities and infrastructure, while industry collaboration brings market insights.

  • Example: Federally funded programs and initiatives, such as those supporting biotech startups in sparking economic growth.

Talent Development and Experiential Learning

Universities are key drivers of talent development. Experiential learning, mentorship, internships, and support for real-world skills are crucial for preparing students for the industry.

  • Example: Programs facilitating internships and co-ops to expose students to industry settings and enhance their understanding of practical applications.

Addressing Important Challenges

Collaboration between researchers and startups can address significant challenges, from agriculture to healthcare. Bridging the gap between academia and industry is crucial for developing impactful solutions.

  • Example: Research institutions and startups working together to address challenges like climate change, autism, and sustainable agriculture.

Networking and Translational Connection

Effective networking between researchers, investors, and policymakers is essential. Facilitating transnational connections can bridge the gap between scientific discoveries and real-world applications.

  • Example: Researchers engaging with investors and policymakers to facilitate the commercialization of research findings.

 7. Q&A session

The Q&A session following Adriana’s presentation provided a platform for probing questions about effectively leveraging research and expertise from academic institutions for startup growth. Here’s a breakdown of the questions and detailed responses.

Question 1: How can startups effectively leverage the research and expertise of academic institutions?

Adriana emphasised the significance of considering commercialization, pointing out areas like drug development and gene therapies, encouraging startups to explore innovative spaces. Funders and legislators play crucial roles; hence, engaging with them becomes vital. We can take a look into drug testing as an example, stating that universities might have limited platforms, and startups could provide tools and platforms to continue the work.

Question 2: How do researchers connect with investors and facilitate translational connections?

Adriana suggested thinking of the big picture and identifying areas where change can happen. Engaging with funders, legislators, and, most importantly, connecting with investors are key steps. She acknowledged the challenge scientists face, primarily being accustomed to lab work. Adriana urged researchers to look beyond, considering policy involvement or contacting their tech transfer office as a small first step.

Question 3: Parallel Perspectives in Europe – Drawing a Parallel Between American and European Startups

Drawing a comparison between American and European startups is valuable. She highlighted the need to explore the conditions under which startups thrive in different regions. This perspective promises to bring valuable insights into the unique challenges and opportunities each region presents.

The Q&A session offered profound insights into the complexities of bridging the gap between academia and startups. Adriana’s responses underscored the importance of strategic networking, engaging with stakeholders, and adopting a holistic approach to innovation. The suggestion to explore regional variations in startup landscapes promises to enrich the ongoing discussion. The intersection of research and entrepreneurship appears as a dynamic space that demands collaboration, adaptability, and an understanding of diverse ecosystems.

8. How has the mentorship program conducted by RAISE demonstrated its impact?

The RAISE session effectively addressed the key goal of bridging researchers and startups. By providing insights and examples, attendees gained knowledge on how universities and startups can collaboratively drive innovation. RAISE further facilitated a deeper understanding of practical steps for effective collaboration, emphasising the importance of strategic networking and engaging with stakeholders. The dynamic interplay between research and entrepreneurship was highlighted as a transformative space demanding collaboration, adaptability, and a nuanced understanding of diverse ecosystems. Collaboration between researchers and startups can address significant challenges. Bridging the gap between academia and industry is crucial for developing impactful solutions.

Key Takeaways

1. Universities as Knowledge Hubs: Universities are knowledge hubs producing valuable insights. Collaboration with startups acts as a bridge between theoretical knowledge and practical solutions.

2. Innovation Funding: Adequate funding is crucial for translating research into impactful innovations. Universities can provide facilities, while industry collaboration brings market insights.

3. Talent Development and Experiential Learning: Universities are key drivers of talent development. Experiential learning, mentorship, internships, and support for real-world skills are crucial for preparing young entrepreneurs for the industry.

4. Talent Development and Experiential Learning: Effective networking between researchers, startups investors, and policymakers is essential. Facilitating translational connections can bridge the gap between scientific discoveries and real-world applications. 

Overall, the session set the stage for a continued work on fostering innovation and impactful collaborations between researchers and startups.


About the Speaker and Mentor: Adriana Bankston

Adriana Bankston is a former bench scientist turned science policy expert, with a wealth of experience in research and academic policy changes within university settings. Her career was dedicated to showcasing research discoveries on a broader scale. Notably, Adriana also led a non-profit organisation and held various entrepreneurial roles, connecting with professionals worldwide.

Adriana Bankston

Adriana’s role as a senior fellow in science policy with the Federation of American Scientists showcased her expertise in policy entrepreneurship. Her work at this non-profit mirrored the dynamic nature of a startup, making her well-equipped to discuss the convergence of science and policy.

Based in Washington, DC, USA, Adriana was ideally positioned to offer valuable insights into research-powered innovation, real-world impact, and the art of building strategic partnerships and talent scouting. Her diverse background and passion for research made her a dynamic speaker for discussions surrounding innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

To learn more about Adriana:

A serios of sessions: Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success
A serios of sessions: Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success 1024 597 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

An event named as “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success,” is set to explore the profound impact of researchers on startup innovation. The event, organized by the RAISE team, is designed to shed light on the invaluable role of researchers in driving real-world impact, innovation, and talent development within the startup ecosystem.

Session: Building Bridges: Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap (Nov 6, 2023)

The event will continue with a second session on November 6, titled “Building Bridges: Connecting Entrepreneurs and Research Talent.” This session aims to delve into the critical aspects of connecting entrepreneurs with research talent to drive innovation.

Agenda

  • 13:00 – Welcome to the session “Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap”
  • 13:05 – The RAISE Project – First session recap  (5-10 minutes) by Adriana Bankston
  • 13:20 – Connecting Entrepreneurs and Research Talent – Adriana Bankston  (15 minutes)

Topics to be covered in Adriana Bankston’s presentation:

  • Navigating the Intersection: The Role of Research Talent in Startup Success
  • Unlocking Opportunities: The Dynamics of Entrepreneur-Researcher Collaboration
  • Fostering Talent: Strategies for Talent Development in Research
  • Policy Entrepreneurship: Shaping Research, Innovation, and Startups
  • 13:35 – Q&A Session (5 minutes)
  • 13:40 – Connecting startups with investors or commercial development opportunitiesJuan Fuentes Fernandez  (15 minutes)

In this presentation, we will cover:

  • The significance of cross-border investments in supporting startups to expand internationally.
    Exploring the potential of foreign smart capital to facilitate the commercial market entry for startups.
    Leveraging experts in international business development for startup growth.
  • How thought leadership and content creation can serve as powerful tools to promote both shares and products for startups.
    Strategies for effectively utilising content to boost visibility and drive business growth in the startup ecosystem.

About the speakers:

Adriana Bankston

Adriana Bankston is a former bench scientist turned science policy expert, with a wealth of experience in research and academic policy changes within university settings. Her career has been dedicated to showcasing research discoveries on a broader scale. Notably, Adriana has also led a non-profit organization and held various entrepreneurial roles, connecting with professionals worldwide.

Adriana’s current role as a senior fellow in science policy with the Federation of American Scientists showcases her expertise in policy entrepreneurship. Her work at this non-profit mirrors the dynamic nature of a startup, making her well-equipped to discuss the convergence of science and policy.

Based in Washington, DC, USA, Adriana is ideally positioned to offer valuable insights into research-powered innovation, real-world impact, and the art of building strategic partnerships and talent scouting. Her diverse background and passion for research make her a dynamic speaker for discussions surrounding innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

To learn more about Adriana:

Website: adrianabankston.com.

Biography: https://fas.org/expert/adriana-bankston/

Juan Fuentes Fernández

Juan Fuentes Fernández Representative for LALIGA in the Nordic Countries | Entertainment & Sports Senior Expert

Location: Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark

Juan Fuentes Fernández, based in Copenhagen, is a seasoned expert in global entertainment and sports management with a comprehensive skill set that includes strategy, international business development, PR & Comms, brand and activation management, project and people management, market research, and CSR.

With a truly global perspective and professional experience across Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, Juan’s career journey highlights his remarkable achievements and contributions.

Professional Experience:

  • LALIGA Delegate for the Nordic Countries (2021-Present): Appointed by LALIGA, the Spanish football league, to lead its growth strategy in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland.
  • LALIGA Delegate for the Middle East (2017-2021): Spearheaded LALIGA’s expansion in Egypt, Sudan, and Libya, delivering a successful growth strategy.
  • Editor at Oxford Business Group (Philippines): Analyzed emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Trade and Investment Advisor for the Embassy of Spain: Represented Spanish interests in Egypt, Lebanon, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Djibouti.
  • Academic Involvement: Conducted research and co-authored a Working Paper for Harvard Business School on LALIGA’s strategic development. Served as an instructor and master thesis supervisor in various programs and universities across Spain and Europe, specializing in sports management. Delivered keynote speeches at conferences aligning with his expertise.
  • Angel Investor: Invests in sports and entertainment-related startups with a focus on industry validation and expansion. Avoids investments in projects or companies collaborating with LALIGA or seeking his organization’s collaboration.
  • Multidisciplinary Project Coordination: Managed diverse teams for award-winning projects, including the Spanish-Arabic football dictionary by the Instituto Cervantes and LALIGA, which received the “Publication of the Year 2021” award in Spain. Led an international team of professionals.
  • Recognition: Shortlisted as a winner in Spain’s inaugural Nova 111 list, recognizing outstanding individuals across key economic sectors, particularly in the telecom, media, and entertainment category.
  • Social Impact Commitment: Dedicated over a decade to volunteering with various NGOs and is a member of Common Goal, donating 1% of his salary to support social causes.

Areas of Expertise:

  • Entertainment & Sports Management
  • International Business Development
  • Strategy and Market Research
  • PR & Comms
  • Brand and Activation Management
  • Project and People Management
  • CSR Initiatives
  • Academic Instruction and Keynote Speaking
  • Angel Investment
  • Multilingual and Multicultural Proficiency

Juan Fuentes Fernández brings a wealth of experience and a deep commitment to making a significant impact across the entertainment, sports, and social impact sectors.

14:00 – 15:00 – Roundtable Discussion with all participants on the Topic: “Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap”

 Topics for Discussion:

  • How to connect entrepreneurs with research talent for startup success?
  • Key elements for successful entrepreneur-researcher partnerships?
  • Role of networking in linking startups with investors or commercial opportunities.
  • Best practices for bridging the gap between startups and potential partners.

Join this transformative event to explore the exciting world of startup innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

Session : “Market Research and Data-Driven Decisions” (Nov 15, 2023) – Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, Silent Accelerator, Belgium

  • How to conduct market research and develop an innovation funnel?
  • Validating ideas with the market and accelerating the process of finding product/market fit for technology-driven startups.
  • Data-Driven Insights: Uncover how researchers conduct market research, analyze consumer behavior, and provide startups with data-powered guidance.
  • Shaping Startup Strategies: Share instances where research-driven market insights have influenced startup strategies for the better.

About the speaker: Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, Silent Accelerator

Venture Development Director – Venture Studio & Accelerator | Business Angel | 2x Founder

  • Prominent player in the European business landscape with expertise in venture capital, marketing strategy, innovation management, and business strategy
  • Mentor at Impact Hub Milano, sharing knowledge and expertise with aspiring entrepreneurs
  • Co-founder of Silent Agency in 2021, excelling in PR, copywriting, media relations, and marketing communications
  • Senior Innovation Consultant at Verhaert Masters in Innovation
  • Specialized in retail category insights and data analysis at Anheuser-Busch InBev

Session: “Using Technology and Data for Talent Matching” (Nov 16, 2023) – Peter Oraya, Data Scientist and the visionary behind Oxford Aptitude Limited

  • Reshaping Modern Talent Matching: Data Science and Tech Unleash Opportunity in the Competitive Job Market”
  • Data-Driven Revolution in Primary Industries: Unlocking Specialized Skills for Agriculture and Manufacturing
  • “Education’s Tech-Driven Evolution: Transforming Talent Matching with Data Science
  • “Tertiary Industry Makeover: How Data and Tech Are Redefining Talent Scouting in Sports and Entertainment”
  • “Evolving Workforce: Perpetual Learning Powered by Data Science and Kimodata

About the speaker: Peter Oraya, Oxford Aptitude Limited

Expertise in:

  • Data { AI, Machine Learning , Story Telling , Big Data, Neural Network, Blockchain, Nanotechnology }
  • Innovation { ideation, experimentation , testing , acceleration}

Register here!

Empowering Innovation: “Leveraging Research for Startup Success” Event
Empowering Innovation: “Leveraging Research for Startup Success” Event 700 440 RAISE fosters startup growth and scale-up within and across Europe

An event named as “Leveraging Research(ers) for Startup Success,” is set to explore the profound impact of researchers on startup innovation. The event, organized by the RAISE team, is designed to shed light on the invaluable role of researchers in driving real-world impact, innovation, and talent development within the startup ecosystem.

Session 1: The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation (Nov 3, 2023)

The first session, titled “The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation,” will kick off at 13:00 CET. The event can be accessed via Zoom if you register here.

Agenda:

  • 13:00 – Welcome to the session “The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation” Presentation of the All 4 Sessions Program (5 minutes) – Presented by the RAISE Team
  • 13:05 – The RAISE Project – The Development of a New and Sustainable Integrated Support Framework for Startups (15 minutes) by RAISE Team
  • 13:20 – “The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation” – Adriana Bankston (15-20 minutes)

Topics to be covered in Adriana Bankston’s presentation:

  • A journey from bench scientist to policy entrepreneur, emphasizing the critical role of researchers in pushing the boundaries of knowledge and innovation.
  • Highlighting the problem-solving skills and creative thinking that researchers bring to the table.
  • Exploring how showcasing research discoveries more broadly can bridge the gap between research and real-world applications.
  • Providing examples of how research can be translated into practical solutions that benefit society.
  • Sharing her experience in leading a non-profit and taking on entrepreneurial roles, and how entrepreneurship and startups can be a catalyst for turning research into impactful solutions.

About the speaker: Adriana Bankston

Adriana Bankston is a former bench scientist turned science policy expert, with a wealth of experience in research and academic policy changes within university settings. Her career has been dedicated to showcasing research discoveries on a broader scale. Notably, Adriana has also led a non-profit organization and held various entrepreneurial roles, connecting with professionals worldwide.

Adriana’s current role as a senior fellow in science policy with the Federation of American Scientists showcases her expertise in policy entrepreneurship. Her work at this non-profit mirrors the dynamic nature of a startup, making her well-equipped to discuss the convergence of science and policy.

Based in Washington, DC, USA, Adriana is ideally positioned to offer valuable insights into research-powered innovation, real-world impact, and the art of building strategic partnerships and talent scouting. Her diverse background and passion for research make her a dynamic speaker for discussions surrounding innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

To learn more about Adriana:

Website: adrianabankston.com.

Biography: https://fas.org/expert/adriana-bankston/

Roundtable Discussion: The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation (Nov 3, 2023)

The event will also feature a roundtable discussion, where all participants will engage in a thought-provoking conversation on the topic “The Researcher’s Impact on Startup Innovation.” The discussion will touch upon various crucial aspects, including how researchers contribute to startups, specific contributions they make, challenges faced in collaboration, effective leveraging of research expertise, and best practices to maximize the researcher’s impact on startup innovation.

The impact of researchers on startup innovation is undeniable, and this event promises to provide valuable insights into the symbiotic relationship between researchers and startups.

Session 2: Building Bridges: Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap (Nov 6, 2023)

The event will continue with a second session on November 6, titled “Building Bridges: Connecting Entrepreneurs and Research Talent.” This session aims to delve into the critical aspects of connecting entrepreneurs with research talent to drive innovation.

Agenda

  • 13:00 – Welcome to the session “Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap”
  • 13:05 – The RAISE Project – First session recap  (5-10 minutes) by Adriana Bankston
  • 13:20 – Connecting Entrepreneurs and Research Talent – Adriana Bankston  (15 minutes)

Topics to be covered in Adriana Bankston’s presentation:

  • Navigating the Intersection: The Role of Research Talent in Startup Success
  • Unlocking Opportunities: The Dynamics of Entrepreneur-Researcher Collaboration
  • Fostering Talent: Strategies for Talent Development in Research
  • Policy Entrepreneurship: Shaping Research, Innovation, and Startups
  • 13:35 – Q&A Session (5 minutes)
  • 13:40 – Connecting startups with investors or commercial development opportunitiesJuan Fuentes Fernandez  (15 minutes)

In this presentation, we will cover:

  • The significance of cross-border investments in supporting startups to expand internationally.
    Exploring the potential of foreign smart capital to facilitate the commercial market entry for startups.
    Leveraging experts in international business development for startup growth.
  • How thought leadership and content creation can serve as powerful tools to promote both shares and products for startups.
    Strategies for effectively utilising content to boost visibility and drive business growth in the startup ecosystem.

About the speaker: Juan Fuentes Fernández

Juan Fuentes Fernández Representative for LALIGA in the Nordic Countries | Entertainment & Sports Senior Expert

Location: Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark

Juan Fuentes Fernández, based in Copenhagen, is a seasoned expert in global entertainment and sports management with a comprehensive skill set that includes strategy, international business development, PR & Comms, brand and activation management, project and people management, market research, and CSR.

With a truly global perspective and professional experience across Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, Juan’s career journey highlights his remarkable achievements and contributions.

Professional Experience:

  • LALIGA Delegate for the Nordic Countries (2021-Present): Appointed by LALIGA, the Spanish football league, to lead its growth strategy in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland.
  • LALIGA Delegate for the Middle East (2017-2021): Spearheaded LALIGA’s expansion in Egypt, Sudan, and Libya, delivering a successful growth strategy.
  • Editor at Oxford Business Group (Philippines): Analyzed emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Trade and Investment Advisor for the Embassy of Spain: Represented Spanish interests in Egypt, Lebanon, Sudan, Ethiopia, and Djibouti.
  • Academic Involvement: Conducted research and co-authored a Working Paper for Harvard Business School on LALIGA’s strategic development. Served as an instructor and master thesis supervisor in various programs and universities across Spain and Europe, specializing in sports management. Delivered keynote speeches at conferences aligning with his expertise.
  • Angel Investor: Invests in sports and entertainment-related startups with a focus on industry validation and expansion. Avoids investments in projects or companies collaborating with LALIGA or seeking his organization’s collaboration.
  • Multidisciplinary Project Coordination: Managed diverse teams for award-winning projects, including the Spanish-Arabic football dictionary by the Instituto Cervantes and LALIGA, which received the “Publication of the Year 2021” award in Spain. Led an international team of professionals.
  • Recognition: Shortlisted as a winner in Spain’s inaugural Nova 111 list, recognizing outstanding individuals across key economic sectors, particularly in the telecom, media, and entertainment category.
  • Social Impact Commitment: Dedicated over a decade to volunteering with various NGOs and is a member of Common Goal, donating 1% of his salary to support social causes.

Areas of Expertise:

  • Entertainment & Sports Management
  • International Business Development
  • Strategy and Market Research
  • PR & Comms
  • Brand and Activation Management
  • Project and People Management
  • CSR Initiatives
  • Academic Instruction and Keynote Speaking
  • Angel Investment
  • Multilingual and Multicultural Proficiency

Juan Fuentes Fernández brings a wealth of experience and a deep commitment to making a significant impact across the entertainment, sports, and social impact sectors.

14:00 – 15:00 – Roundtable Discussion with all participants on the Topic: “Connecting Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Research Talents: Bridging the Gap”

 Topics for Discussion:

  • How to connect entrepreneurs with research talent for startup success?
  • Key elements for successful entrepreneur-researcher partnerships?
  • Role of networking in linking startups with investors or commercial opportunities.
  • Best practices for bridging the gap between startups and potential partners.

Join this transformative event to explore the exciting world of startup innovation, collaboration, and talent development.

Session 3: “Market Research and Data-Driven Decisions” (Nov 15, 2023) – Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, Silent Accelerator, Belgium

  • How to conduct market research and develop an innovation funnel?
  • Validating ideas with the market and accelerating the process of finding product/market fit for technology-driven startups.
  • Data-Driven Insights: Uncover how researchers conduct market research, analyze consumer behavior, and provide startups with data-powered guidance.
  • Shaping Startup Strategies: Share instances where research-driven market insights have influenced startup strategies for the better.

About the speaker: Alexandra Potter-Hnativ, Silent Accelerator

Venture Development Director – Venture Studio & Accelerator | Business Angel | 2x Founder

  • Prominent player in the European business landscape with expertise in venture capital, marketing strategy, innovation management, and business strategy
  • Mentor at Impact Hub Milano, sharing knowledge and expertise with aspiring entrepreneurs
  • Co-founder of Silent Agency in 2021, excelling in PR, copywriting, media relations, and marketing communications
  • Senior Innovation Consultant at Verhaert Masters in Innovation
  • Specialized in retail category insights and data analysis at Anheuser-Busch InBev

Session 4: “Using Technology and Data for Talent Matching” (Nov 16, 2023) – Peter Oraya, Data Scientist and the visionary behind Oxford Aptitude Limited

  • Reshaping Modern Talent Matching: Data Science and Tech Unleash Opportunity in the Competitive Job Market”
  • Data-Driven Revolution in Primary Industries: Unlocking Specialized Skills for Agriculture and Manufacturing
  • “Education’s Tech-Driven Evolution: Transforming Talent Matching with Data Science
  • “Tertiary Industry Makeover: How Data and Tech Are Redefining Talent Scouting in Sports and Entertainment”
  • “Evolving Workforce: Perpetual Learning Powered by Data Science and Kimodata

About the speaker: Peter Oraya, Oxford Aptitude Limited

Expertise in:

  • Data { AI, Machine Learning , Story Telling , Big Data, Neural Network, Blockchain, Nanotechnology }
  • Innovation { ideation, experimentation , testing , acceleration}
Privacy Preferences

When you visit our website, it may store information through your browser from specific services, usually in the form of cookies. Our Privacy Policy can be read here.

Here you can change your Privacy preferences. It is worth noting that blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience on our website and the services we are able to offer.

Click to enable/disable Google Analytics tracking code.
Click to enable/disable Google Fonts.
Click to enable/disable Google Maps.
Click to enable/disable video embeds.
Our website uses cookies, mainly from 3rd party services. Define your Privacy Preferences and/or agree to our use of cookies.